admissions

Dominican U. Is Latest to Admit Admissions Data Misreporting

Dominican University of California announced last week that it had for many years misreported admissions data to the Education Department as well as to U.S. News & World Report and other groups that rank colleges. At Dominican, the problem was in calculating the number of applications. Contrary to established procedures, Dominican counted incomplete applications in determining the total number of applications. As a result, the college's admission rate appeared more competitive than it really is. For the class that entered in the fall of 2011, Dominican had reported a 53.7 percent admission rate. The real rate was 72.6 percent.

 

Ad keywords: 

Survey Finds Continued Gap Between High Schools and Colleges

A new survey from ACT shows the continued gap between those who teach in high school and those who teach in college when it comes to their perceptions of the college preparation of today's students. Nearly 90 percent of high school teachers told ACT that their students are either “well” or “very well” prepared for college-level work in their subject area after leaving their courses. But only 26 percent of college instructors reported that their incoming students are either "well" or "very well" prepared for first-year credit-bearing courses in their subject area. The percentages are virtually unchanged from a similar survey in 2009.

Ad keywords: 

Kerry: Gun Violence Scares Foreign Students From Enrolling

Secretary of State John Kerry told CNN on Monday that international students – in particular those from Japan -- are scared of coming to the United States because of fears of gun violence. "We had an interesting discussion about why fewer students are coming to, particularly from Japan, to study in the United States, and one of the responses I got from our officials from conversations with parents here is that they're actually scared. They think they're not safe in the United States and so they don't come," Kerry told the broadcaster.

The number of international students from Japan is on the decline, but, as CNN noted, there are also other demographic and economic explanations.

Another college admits to calculating incorrect SAT averages

Section: 
Smart Title: 

York College of Pennsylvania is latest to admit that it wasn't submitting correct numbers. In this case, "special admits" were left out of the calculation.

Irish university tries to recruit voters to improve its international ranking

Smart Title: 

President of Irish university asks all academic employees to recruit peers from other institutions to join peer review survey that is key part of QS rankings.

Study finds small gains in international graduate applications

Smart Title: 

Report finds only marginal increase in applications from outside the U.S. to graduate schools. China -- source of large increases in recent years -- shows decline.

U. of Arizona Law School Loses Students, Cuts Tuition

The University of Arizona has announced an 11 percent cut in tuition for in-state residents and an 8 percent cut for out-of-state residents -- even as most other students at the university will be paying 3 percent more next year. The Arizona Daily Star reported that the press release said that the cuts were "part of the college's larger plan to help students manage law school costs." But the newspaper noted what was left out of the press release: Enrollment of first-year students dropped 14 percent last fall, and applications are down 35 percent since 2005.

 

Ad keywords: 

Essay on getting a first job in admissions

W. Kent Barnds offers advice for those trying to switch into admissions from other professions.

Ad keywords: 
Section: 
Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 

Research suggests that top colleges could attract many more high-achieving, low-income students

Section: 
Smart Title: 

Study suggests that there's a way for top colleges to attract and enroll more low-income, high-achieving applicants, and that the methods to do so are inexpensive. So why isn't this strategy being used?

Resolving Suit, Oxford Will Review Admission Policy

The University of Oxford has agreed to review policies under which its St. Hughes College has required applicants to demonstrate -- as a condition of admission -- that they can afford the living expenses, BBC reported. The agreement resolved a suit filed by an applicant who said he was rejected when he could not demonstrate that he had that money on hand. The applicant said that the rules were a human rights violation.

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - admissions
Back to Top