admissions

Maryland Governor Vetoes ‘Ban the Box’ Bill

Maryland Governor Larry Hogan has vetoed legislation that would have barred colleges from asking about a prospective student’s criminal history on applications. The Republican governor wrote in a letter explaining his veto of the two bills from both chambers of the state’s Legislature that he felt student safety would be jeopardized.

“This could lead to situations where a school unknowingly admits a student with a violent past or feels it must accept a student with a criminal history for fear of running afoul of the law,” Hogan wrote.

Hogan noted in his letter that the legislation did not differentiate between a felony crime -- like a sexual assault -- and a misdemeanor.

The bills did allow institutions to include a question about criminal history on applications through a third party, if the institution posted a notice on its website that criminal history does not disqualify an applicant from being admitted.

“While individuals of all criminal backgrounds should be given educational, employment and growth opportunities, colleges and universities must have the ability to know who they are accepting onto their campuses. We should not encourage schools to turn a blind eye to a prospective student’s potentially violent criminal background,” Hogan wrote.

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Compilation on Uncertainty Over International Enrollments

Inside Higher Ed is pleased to release today our latest print-on-demand compilation, "Coping With Uncertainty: American Colleges and International Students." You may download the booklet, free, here. And you may sign up here for a free webinar on the themes of the booklet on Tuesday, June 13, at 2 p.m. Eastern.

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U Texas Alters Admissions Rules for Valedictorians

Madison Mau, the valedictorian of a 10-student graduating class at Fayetteville High, in a 258-person town in Texas, managed to convince the University of Texas at Austin to change its admissions policies, The Texas Tribune reported. The university currently automatically admits the top 7 percent of the class of every public high school. But if you are like Mau, you may have a perfect record, but it's impossible to be in the top 7 percent. She campaigned, and the university relented, for valedictorians of such high schools.

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A review of the week in admissions news

U of California sets out-of-state limits; leaks about Trump budget and student aid; FAFSA use is up; and more.

Essay on colleges' approach to families ability and willingness to pay college costs

Richard DiFeliciantonio considers the realities and contradictions of financial aid and admissions policy.

 

Canadian universities report surge in U.S. students committing to enroll

American students -- at record numbers -- are accepting offers of admissions from Canadian universities. So are students from other parts of the world.

Experts respond to proposal to reform b-school rankings

A research paper renews the debate over who is really helped by rankings. Experts weigh in on the arguments.

An admissions reformer takes stock of the use of noncognitive variables

William Sedlacek, a pioneer in the use of noncognitive measures for admissions, discusses his new book on the state of the movement.

U of California Limits Out-of-State Enrollments

The University of California Board of Regents voted Thursday to cap out-of-state enrollment at 18 percent of undergraduate enrollment at the five campuses currently below that level. But for the other four campuses -- generally those with the most admissions demand -- current out-of-state levels may be maintained. At the University of California, Berkeley, that rate is more than 24 percent, and the San Diego and Los Angeles campuses both have rates over 22 percent. The policy was adopted as Governor Jerry Brown, a Democrat, and legislators have pushed the system to admit more Californians.

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