admissions

Crime rankings set off new debate on their validity

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Should colleges be ranked based on crime statistics? And if they should, why are two prominent rankings yielding such different results?

China May Regulate Recruiting Agents

Reports have been circulating in China that the government may impose new rules on agents who recruit students for colleges in the United States and other countries, Voice of America reported. Increasing numbers of American colleges have been hiring agents, but the use of those paid in part on commission remains highly controversial. Chinese media outlets have recently been reporting on unscrupulous agents who have taken advantage of students.

 

School Counselors Want More Training, Survey Finds

A survey by the College Board has found that most school counselors do not feel that they have been sufficiently trained in competencies that would allow them to provide the best guidance to students on the college admissions process. Further, a majority of counselors believe that they could do better (in some cases with better training) at such key functions as helping students complete college preparatory courses, increasing college application rates and improving high school graduation rates.

 

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Study: Materials encouraging college-going seem to make a difference

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Videos and other material making postsecondary education seem accessible appear to encourage college-going behaviors, study finds.

Error in the SAT Question of the Day

Each day, the College Board offers an online "Official SAT Question of the Day" to help students prepare. The question also indicates what percentage of those who tried it answered correctly. The question for Friday shows an unusually low correct answer rate (28 percent). But that may not reflect a weakness in mathematics education. Until some time over the weekend, the College Board's website was telling people who answered correctly that they were wrong, and those who selected one of the incorrect answers that they were correct.

The question: If 24/15 = 4/n, what is the value of 4n

A. 6

B. 10

C. 12

D. 30

E. 60

Michael Paul Goldenberg wrote at the website of Rational Mathematics Education that he answered B (the correct answer) and was told by the website that the correct answer was A. He also noted that the explanation for the incorrect answer (A) actually pointed to B being the real answer.

Michael Pearson, executive director of the Mathematical Association of America, said that the explanations were correct from the start (even when the answer was incorrect), so that "it's clear that someone simply set the wrong answer among the multiple-choice selections."

In an e-mail Sunday, a College Board spokeswoman confirmed that the error was in programming the answer key, and said that "we have resolved the issue and apologize for any confusion this may have caused."

 

 

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Undocumented Students May Pay In-State Rates in Massachusetts

Governor Deval Patrick of Massachusetts, a Democrat, has ordered state higher education officials to allow undocumented students to pay in-state tuition rates as long as they receive work permits through President Obama's new program to eliminate their risk of deportation, The Boston Globe reported. Thousands of students may eventually benefit. Because these students aren't eligible for federal aid, non-resident tuition rates can be prohibitive for many of them.

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Another Drop in LSAT Test-Takers

October is typically the most popular month for prospective law students to take the Law School Admission Test -- and this October's totals provide more evidence that all those reports about lawyers struggling to find jobs and pay back loans may be discouraging interest in the field. While 37,780 people took the LSAT in October, that's a 16.4 percent drop from October 2011, the total that year was a 16.9 percent drop from October 2010, and the total for that year represented a 10.5 percent drop. There have not been this few LSAT test-takers in October since 1999.

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'U.S. News' Moves George Washington U. to 'Unranked' Category

U.S. News & World Report has announced that it has moved George Washington University to the category of "unranked" colleges. The announcement follows an admission by the university last week that it had been for years inflating the percentage of new students who graduated in the top 10 percent of their classes. A blog post by Robert Morse, who directs rankings surveys for the magazine, explained the rationale for the switch in the university's category. But the blog post did not explain -- and Morse declined to explain -- why George Washington was moved to the "unranked" group while that has not happened to other colleges that have in the last year admitted sending the magazine incorrect data.

 

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Scrutiny of Californians at U. of Oregon

The University of Oregon, like many public universities that lack the state support they would like, is stepping up efforts to recruit out-of-state students who are charged much more than Oregon residents. The Register-Guard reported that these efforts have been so successful -- particularly in attracting students from Southern California who are relatively wealthy -- that lawmakers and some Oregon students are worried that low-income students from the state could be shut out. Oregonians also complain that the Californians aren't as serious about academics, with many quoting the motto "Cs get degrees."

 

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Mount Holyoke holds tuition level for second consecutive year

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Mount Holyoke sticks with tuition freeze for a second consecutive year, reflecting growing concern about the price of college.

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