admissions

Admissions Group to Flesh out Position on Commissioned Agents

The National Association for College Admission Counseling has released draft proposed additions to its Statement of Principles of Good Practice that would expand on last year’s change permitting member universities to use commission-based agents in international student recruiting if they ensure accountability, integrity and transparency. The proposed additions, to be considered by the NACAC Assembly at the annual conference in late September, would flesh out those terms. Specifically the proposed interpretative language states that members will

• “ensure institutional accountability by monitoring the actions of those commission-based agents acting on the institution’s behalf;”

• “ensure transparency with a conspicuous statement on their website that indicates their institution uses agents who are compensated on a per capita basis;"

• “ensure integrity by dealing ethically and impartially with applicants and other stakeholders, honoring commitments and acting in a manner that respects the trust and confidence placed in the institutions and the individuals representing them;"

• “adhere to U.S. recruitment and remuneration laws (U.S. Higher Education Act) for U.S. citizens, where applicable;”

• “not contract with secondary school personnel for remunerations for referred students.”

The proposed language also would frame the use of agents in more negative terms. While the language approved by the NACAC Assembly last year reads that “Members who choose to use incentive-based agents when recruiting students outside the U.S. will ensure accountability, transparency and integrity,” a proposed revised version of that sentence would state that members will “not employ agents who are compensated on a per capita basis when recruiting students outside the United States, unless ensuring they and their agents conduct themselves with accountability, transparency, and integrity.”

 

The #PayMyTuition Challenge

Students inspired by (or tired of) the "ice bucket challenge" for ALS research have taken to Twitter with the #PayMyTuition challenge, in which they are challenging various celebrities to help finance their higher education. There are lots of requests to the usual suspects -- President Obama, Oprah Winfrey, Bill Gates, etc. Also there have been some notable responses. At Austin Peay State University, the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, responded by noting that ROTC does in fact pay tuition. (Of course ROTC requires a much more serious commitment than dumping a bucket of ice on one's head or tweeting.) Blackboard responded with a contest inviting students to explain how they will use their education to make the world a better place. First place is a $15,000 scholarship.

 

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Plymouth State Goes Test-Optional on Admissions

Plymouth State University, in New Hampshire, has ended a requirement that applicants submit SAT or ACT scores. A statement from the university said that it will continue to place the most emphasis on applicants' high school performance.

 

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Faculty at one public university are asked to get involved in student retention

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With enrollment declining, the president of the University of Southern Maine wants faculty members to call students to make sure they return this fall.

Mills Adopts New Approach on Transgender Admissions

Mills College is adopting a new, more open approach on admissions for transgender students. To date, most women's colleges have rejected applicants who were born men and may still legally be men, but who identify as women. Mills will now accept them as well as applicants who do not identify as male or female, but who were designated as female at birth, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. Mills also said it would not accept undergraduate applicants who were born female, but who legally have become male. Like many women's colleges, Mills will continue to educate students admitted under its policies but whose gender identity changes after enrollment.

 

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ACT's annual score report shows languishing racial gaps, mediocre scores

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The ACT's annual score report, released today, shows persistent racial achievement gaps and stagnant average scores -- with the majority of test-takers failing to meet college readiness benchmarks.

What Students Were Looking For

A new survey of new students at two-year and four-year colleges -- of students who participate in Cappex.com, a service that helps colleges identify prospective students -- found notable demographic differences in what students said that they wanted in a college. Among the differences:

  • Female students with high SAT and ACT scores said that they focused on colleges with strong academic records.
  • Male students with lower SAT scores ranked “appealing campus traditions” and big-time athletics as key to their choices.
  • Minority students -- but not white students -- said that they gained key information from college fairs and emails from admissions offices.
  • Southern students, more than those elsewhere, cared about colleges having "appealing" traditions.

The survey was conducted by Lipman Hearne and Cappex.

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Sociologists analyze access issues in higher education

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Sociologists, in annual meeting focused on economic hardship, consider policies and practices that hinder advancement of low-income students.

ABA Approves Changes in Law School Accreditation

The American Bar Association's governing council has approved changes in the ABA rules for accrediting law schools, The National Law Journal reported. The changes will require that law school have students gain experience in clinics or other real world settings, and will shift an emphasis from the qualifications of entering students to measures of learning and placement rates. The ABA and law schools have been criticized for not doing enough in the past about law schools that enroll students who may have little chance at employment in jobs sufficient to repay their loans.

 

Compilation of Articles on Educating Nontraditional Students

Inside Higher Ed is today releasing a free compilation of articles -- in print-on-demand format -- about strategies for recruiting, retaining and graduating nontraditional students. The articles involve a wide range of institutions, the use of technology and different curricular approaches.

This booklet is part of a series of such compilations that Inside Higher Ed is publishing on a range of topics.

On Thursday, September 11 at 1 p.m. Eastern, Inside Higher Ed editors Scott Jaschik and Doug Lederman will conduct a free webinar to talk about the issues raised in the booklet's articles. To register for the webinar, please click here.

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