admissions

ACT scores are flat

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Changes have been negligible over the last five years.

Study examines contradictions that define today's young people

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Today's students are connected/isolated, internationally inclined/globally ignorant, and ambitious/dependent, posing challenges for colleges that enroll them, a new study finds.
 

West Virginia U. Named Top Party School

It's a ranking that makes many administrators cringe: top party school. On Monday, Princeton Review gave the "honor" to West Virginia University. (The ranking methodology is based on a survey of students related to the use of alcohol and drugs, hours of study and the popularity of Greek life.) The next four universities on the list are the University of Iowa, Ohio University (last year's winner), the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Georgia. A spokeswoman for West Virginia University told the Associated Press: “If you look at the schools on this list, they are mostly large, public universities with strong academic and research profiles, as well as highly successful athletic programs. But in the big picture, clearly this list has no real credibility."

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Study documents social networking on college websites

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Study tracks how many and which tools are most popular among highly ranked colleges.

Deep Springs Moves Ahead With Coeducation

Deep Springs College on Wednesday formally invited women to apply for admission to the class that will enroll in the fall of 2013. Deep Springs announced last year that it would admit women, but the college didn't specify a timetable. The college is a small, unusual institution that admits very small classes (currently, enrollment in the two-year program is 26, and there are no plans to increase enrollment with coeducation) of highly intelligent students who take intense courses while managing both the college and its farm in an isolated spot in the High Desert of California. Students who complete the program are admitted as transfer students to some of the most competitive colleges in the country. All students receive a full scholarship (worth $50,000 a year).

David Neidorf, the president, said in an interview that the college would make no changes -- "none whatsoever" -- in its academic or non-academic expectations of students. He said that the main decision the college faced, after deciding to admit women, was whether to go gender-blind in admissions or to aim to admit classes with roughly equal numbers of men and women. The college opted for the latter approach for now, with the goal of "critical mass," he said. He said he expected that at some point in the future, the college would become gender-blind in admissions.

Some alumni who disagree with the decision to admit woman have sued the college to block coeducation. The official invitation to women states that, due to litigation, "we may be prevented from admitting them to the college," but goes on to express optimism that coeducation will start in 2013. Neidorf said that much of the legal challenge focuses on a specific trust that was set up to support the education of men. He said that this trust provides only about 9 percent of the college's funds, so that Deep Springs plans to rely on its other financial resources until the litigation ends.

Some critics of coeducation at Deep Springs have questioned whether student romances may become more prevalent and potentially problematic at Deep Springs with both male and female students present in an isolated, closely knit environment. Neidorf said that there will be "no hard and fast rules," but that there would be discussion of the values of "self-conscious introspection" and "collective responsibility" with regard to the personal choices students make.

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U. of Texas Files Brief in Key Affirmative Action Case

The University of Texas on Monday filed its brief before the U.S. Supreme Court in the affirmative action case that will be heard this fall. Texas has prevailed in lower courts, but faces a strong challenge and a potentially skeptical Supreme Court. The brief stresses that the university believes that having a diverse student body is an educational issue. Diversity, the brief says, "better prepares students to become the next generation of leaders in an increasingly diverse work force and society." But the brief also takes care to say that the university does not define diversity solely by race and ethnicity. "UT has a broad vision of diversity, which looks to a wide variety of individual characteristics — including an applicant’s culture; language; family; educational, geographic, and socioeconomic background; work, volunteer, or internship experiences; leadership experiences; special artistic or other talents, as well as race and ethnicity."

 

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House Bill Bans Visas to Enroll at Unaccredited Colleges

The U.S. House of Representative last week passed legislation that would bar anyone outside the U.S. from receiving a student visa to enroll at an unaccredited institution. The measure provides an exemption if the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has certified a new institution that has not yet obtained accreditation from an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. The legislation was prompted by recent scandals involving institutions in California that have attracted foreign students without accreditation.

Applicant sues over law school's alleged failure to account for grade inflation in admissions

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Applicant alleges that Baylor University's law school discriminated against him by not accounting for grade inflation in admissions.

Testing Scandal at Piedmont Technical

A 16-year-old has admitted to taking entry exams under the names of others seeking to get into Piedmont Technical College, in South Carolina, WYFF4 News reported. The youth was paid $150 per test. In addition, authorities said that they believed a proctor had been helping students pass entry exams so they could become eligible for Pell Grants. The proctor was fired last year. The college asked federal officials to investigate at that time, having found what it considered irregularities in its use of Pell Grants.

Questions about how presidents rank institutions are raising eyebrows

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Presidents and admissions directors are trying to figure out who is asking a new round of questions -- and why.

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