assessmentaccountability

Study assesses how megafoundations have changed role of higher ed philanthropy

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Study documents how Gates and Lumina -- by collaborating with government, funding intermediaries, and investing heavily in messaging -- have reshaped the philanthropic role in higher education, for better and worse.

Connecticut legislature mulls elimination of remedial courses

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Connecticut lawmakers want to eliminate all non-credit remedial courses. While a compromise is likely to emerge, the state's approach is seen as visionary by some, foolish by others.

CUNY faculty sue to block new core curriculum

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Faculty groups at CUNY sue to fight general education requirements, saying graduation rate obsession will lead to weaker academic rigor.

For-profit group's new leader calls for self-regulation and collaboration

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Steve Gunderson has plenty of friends, including the Senate's leading critic of for-profit colleges. But the new head of the sector's trade group isn't afraid to pick a fight -- even with one of his members.

Texas wants to boost four-year graduation rate by 20 points

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U. of Texas committee unveils plan to graduate 70 percent of next year's freshmen in four years -- up from 50 percent today.

Education Department raises hackles over clock hour definition

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The Education Department's take on the definition of "clock hour" programs is too broad and could unfairly cut into federal aid, say a Texas state agency and for-profits.

Obama higher education plan signals policy shift

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President Obama lays out details for his plan to hold colleges accountable for rising prices, with ramifications beyond the election this fall.

Improving Graduation Rates Is Job One at City Colleges of Chicago

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City Colleges of Chicago have a 7 percent graduation rate. If that number doesn't go up, the system's chancellor, presidents and trustees could lose their jobs.

Warren, Other Democrats Take Aim at Accreditors

U.S. Senators Elizabeth Warren, Dick Durbin and Brian Schatz on Thursday introduced legislation that would increase accountability for accreditors and require new standards for student outcomes they use to evaluate colleges and universities. Warren and Durbin have frequently called for greater accountability in higher education, particularly in the for-profit college sector. But the bill suggests a new focus by consumer advocates on the role of accrediting agencies in providing oversight of colleges.

Earlier this week, the umbrella organization of seven regional accrediting bodies announced that its members would conduct a joint review of institutions with extremely low graduation rates -- a move that followed heavy scrutiny of accreditors’ performance in both the media and policy circles.

The Accreditation Reform and Enhanced Accountability Act would direct the Education Department to establish clear student outcome data, require accreditors to respond quickly to both state and federal investigations, add more transparency to accreditation decisions, address conflict-of-interest issues involving accreditors and the colleges they oversee, and give the department more power to punish or terminate failing accreditors, among other measures.

“Accrediting agencies are supposed to make sure students get a good education and ensure colleges aren’t cheating students while sucking down taxpayer money. But right now the accreditation system is broken,” Warren said. “This bill gives the Education Department more tools to hold accreditors accountable, increases accreditors’ focus on student outcomes and affordability, and requires accreditors to respond when there is evidence of colleges committing fraud.”

The Council of Regional Accrediting Commissions this week highlighted issues involving discrepancies in federal data on student outcomes, specifically involving graduation rates. The group of regional accreditors cited a need for better data from the Department of Education and said its members would consider additional information in their review of institutions with low graduation rates.

Cal State U Seeks to Boost Graduation Rates

The California State University System's governing board this week voted to increase its graduation rates by 2025, an effort that will cost an estimated $400 million or more. The system said it would seek to hit a 70 percent rate (meaning the six-year rate for freshmen), which would be a 13 percentage point increase from the current rate of 57 percent. The graduation-rate push also will include efforts to close achievement gaps for underrepresented and low-income students.

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