diversity

Introduction of new career advice column for minority academics

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Kerry Ann Rockquemore answers the questions she most often receives from minority scholars launching their careers.

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Kerry Ann Rockquemore
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Lawsuits allege affirmative action violations

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Lawsuits seek to end considerations of race in admissions at Harvard and U. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Tennessee athletics to drop 'Lady' from women's programs

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U. of Tennessee angers many fans and alumni with plan to drop the "Lady Vols" logo, which supporters say is a sign of honor. But most colleges that once used such names for women's teams dropped them long ago.

Furor over a scientist's shirt showing women as sex objects

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People took note when a scientist explained a major breakthrough while wearing a shirt showing women as sex objects.

Following Complaint, 2 Resignations at San Jose State

Mohammad Qayoumi, president of San Jose State University, announced two resignations on Friday --  Wanda Ginner, a member of the board of the university's foundation, and Rebecca Dukes, vice president for university advancement. While Qayoumi did not explicitly identify them as the subjects of recent campus debate, social media and local news reports said that they were. Protests last week were held amid reports that a member of the foundation board had said at a meeting that "I contribute to the university because these little Latinas do not have the DNA to be successful," and that a senior university official at the meeting said nothing. The Associated Press reported that Ginner has denied the quote attributed to her.

Syracuse Chancellor Apologizes on Communication

Kent Syverud, chancellor of Syracuse University, has issued a statement in which he apologizes for the way some recent decisions were communicated to the campus. The statement comes as a student sit-in (at right) -- focused on a range of issues, with an emphasis on concerns the university is backing off commitment to minority students -- is in its second week. In his statement, Syverud said that he had learned from the protest movement, but he suggested that it was time for it to end the sit-in, and for protesting students to work instead with the student government to voice concerns. "To make significant change, though, we need to move forward," he said. "Tonight we responded with our final written response and have informed THE General Body [the name of the protest movement]  that our time must now be spent addressing the needs of the entire student body."

THE General Body announced that it would respond in full today. But its initial response was critical of the chancellor's statement. "After two days of not communicating with us, Chancellor Syverud’s e-mail of a 'final offer', copied to the entire university community, is counterproductive to the negotiation process. The administration has made real promises, but too many responses are vague and direct us to preexisting processes that are not transparent and disinclude student voices. THE General Body is unsatisfied with this offer and continues to demand the administration recognize our outcry against the rapid and undemocratic revision of university goals and missions. We reiterate our insistence that undermining the demographics of our student body, the mental and sexual health of our students, the accessibility and safety of our campus, and the relationship of Syracuse with its community are not appropriate or democratic ways to balance our budget."

 

Closing the Law School Gender Gap

Reducing class size and shaking up grading systems could help close the gender gap in professional schools, suggests new research in the Journal of Legal Studies. Authors Daniel Ho and Mark Kelman, both professors of law at Stanford University, say that common professional school pedagogies, such as the Socratic and adversarial methods, may put women at a disadvantage when class sizes are big. In their study, Ho and Kelman analyzed 15,689 grades assigned by 91 instructors to 1,897 students from 2001-12.

During the first part of that time period, from 2001-08, women earned grades that were 0.05 grade-point-average points lower than those for men. But in the data from 2008-12, when Stanford adopted a lower-pressure “honors and pass” grading system, the gender gap disappeared across all classes. That change didn't just reflect "masked" grade differences under the new system, the authors determined through a kind of "shadow" grade analysis of pre-2008 data -- women were really doing better. And in a mandatory class whose size was shrunk and instruction was made more “simulation-intensive,” involving more student interaction and participation, the gender gap was reversed.

Although the original gender gap was relatively small, the authors say, it’s statistically significant when students hit the law job market. For example, they say, a GPA increase from 3.6 to 3.65 is associated with a 7 percent higher chance of landing a federal appellate clerkship. Kelman said that the study refutes a common assumption that performance is predetermined by "fixed" student traits. "To me, the most important finding is the most general one: gender inequality is sensitive to pedagogy," he said via email. "I think this fact is more significant than the particular pedagogical mechanisms that were in play here at Stanford."

Essay on women's colleges admitting transgender students

We have been hearing about how various women’s colleges are responding to the challenges presented by the way in which gender is currently evolving in our society and culture. The question facing women’s colleges should be distinguished from the general matter of civil rights that transgender people should expect and the respect they should enjoy from fellow members of society. It has to do specifically with whether an institution believes itself to have a continuing mission as a women’s college.

There are different forms of transgenderism, among them being those biological/legal males who identify as women; biological/legal women who identify as men; and those who, for various reasons and in various ways, do not feel themselves to fit within a two-gender system at all.

Of these different categories, the one that women’s colleges would seem to have the most compelling need to address is that of persons who are legally male as identified by our society (based on biology/anatomy), but who feel themselves to be women and wish to be considered as such. One can well understand why a women’s college would want to be open to them. Here the question is what admissions criteria a college may use so as to preserve the institution as a women’s college while admitting these students. Legal advice will surely be useful in this context.

It is also fitting and proper – as well as being generally the case – that women’s colleges support individual students who enter as women in the terms defined by our society and subsequently find themselves on a different gender journey. They should feel welcome, receive the support they may need through the remainder of their time at the college, and be received happily among the institution’s alums.

Beyond that, it is less clear why a women’s college should feel the need or the responsibility to make institutional adaptations to the general category of biological/anatomical women who already self-identify as men by the time they apply to college. While there is no legal basis for denying admission to such students, one well might question their expectation that a women’s college should make a variety of special adaptations to them as a subgroup of the student body. Insofar as transgenderism  involves taking a less biologically fundamentalist approach to gender, then why would one emphasize the difference between a biological male and a transman (i.e., a biological female who self-identifies as male)?  And why would a women’s college make the kind of adaptation to transmen that it would not make to men who have come by that status in a more traditional way?

If, indeed, the goal is to take less of a biologically fundamentalist approach to gender, then one would think an appropriate response to such students would be encouraging them to apply to some destination other than a women’s college to pursue their higher education. A similar point might be made for young people who do not want such categories as “women” and “men” to apply to them at all.

Some transmen who apply to women’s colleges have said that they do so because these are places where they would feel safe. This raises the question of what it takes these days to make students feel “safe” and whether the lengths to which colleges tend to go in that project – the many “safe” spaces that have been popping up on campuses for various special groups – do more to enhance a sense of vulnerability than to make young people stronger. It is hard to imagine that transgender students would be in greater danger at a place like Hampshire, Bard, Wesleyan, Antioch, Macalester or any number of institutions especially known for their open attitudes to culture change than at Wellesley or Mount Holyoke.

Unless, of course, they were buying into some familiar gender stereotypes, which would seem to be the case for women’s colleges themselves if they were to assert that they are uniquely qualified to welcome transgender students. Women’s colleges might argue that, having dealt with one stigmatized and disadvantaged group, they are well-situated to deal with another. But, just as women’s colleges do not and would not want to corner the market on feminists, so they do not and should not want to corner the market on those able to understand and accept transgenderism. Moreover, it is not as if women’s colleges hold some kind of privileged place in the world of higher education or operate as special paths to social privilege, as men’s colleges did once upon a time.

In brief, it would be reasonable and understandable for a women’s college to decide that gender as a basis for admission and for participation in the life of the institution no longer makes sense in this day and age. The college could then decide that it no longer wishes to be a women’s college. But, if it still wishes to be a women’s college, then it should reasonably be expected to serve women.

 

Judith Shapiro is former president of Barnard College and also is a former professor and provost at Bryn Mawr College.

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Harcum criticized for ad showing black man with basketball

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Harcum College has a campaign in which a woman appears headed to a health profession and a black man is shown in a suit with a basketball. Is this a perpetuation of stereotypes?

Simmons Will Admit Transgender Applicants

Simmons College, in Massachusetts, has become the third women's college to announce that it will admit transgender applicants, The Boston Globe reported. Many women's colleges, formally or informally, have not taken action against students who enroll as women and who later determine that they identify as male. Simmons is now formally stating that such student are welcome. In addition, Simmons will now admit those who are born biologically male but who identify as women.

Mills and Mount Holyoke Colleges this year announced shifts in their admissions policies to welcome transgender applicants.

 

 

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