diversity

UNC Greensboro Drops Name of Racist on Auditorium

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro's board voted last week to change the name of the Aycock Auditorium (right), which has honored Charles B. Aycock, who served as governor of North Carolina from 1901 to 1905. Aycock was a supporter of public education -- for white people -- but was a white supremacist who pushed to limit rights for black people. The university is starting a process to determine a new name for the auditorium. Duke University changed the name of a residence hall honoring Aycock in 2014.

Blackface or a Cosmetic Treatment?

A debate has been set off at the University of Wisconsin at Whitewater over a photo on Snapchat that appears to show two students in blackface (at right). Beverly Kopper, the chancellor, sent a message to the campus condemning the image and calling for more campus discussions of inclusiveness. But then the students said that they were not engaged in blackface but were using cosmetics to give themselves a facial treatment. That prompted Steve Nass, a state legislator, to condemn the chancellor, saying she had overreacted in a "knee-jerk" way. Some black students are saying that, even if one was not seeking to portray blackface, people should know not to post images that look like blackface.

Ad keywords: 

Essay on accessible academic research

If our research never gets out of the ivory tower, then who is it helping, asks Jackson Wright Shultz.

Job Tags: 
Ad keywords: 
Section: 
Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 
Image Size: 

Advice to a white professor about mentoring scholars of color (essay)

Category: 

You don’t need to be a person of color to mentor a colleague of color, writes Kerry Ann Rockquemore, but you do need to rethink what it means to be a mentor.

Job Tags: 
Ad keywords: 
Section: 
Topic: 
Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 

Jewish Professors Charge Wheelock With Bias

Two Jewish professors have filed complaints with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission charging Wheelock College with anti-Jewish bias, The Boston Globe reported. The complaints say that after the professors complained about a lack of Jewish perspective in various campus discussions, the administration spread false reports that they were racist, hurting their reputations and careers. Wheelock officials said the claims were "without merit."

Ad keywords: 

Scalia's record, higher education and pending affirmative action case

Smart Title: 

Justice's death may not change outcome on affirmative action, which he opposed. His record includes key votes and dissents on issues of black colleges, hate speech, single-sex public higher education and church-state line.

Study finds bias in how male students view female STEM students

Smart Title: 

Do the biology students celebrated (perhaps undeservingly) for their intellect always seem to be male? A new study says the answer lies in gender bias.

Earlham tries to reach consensus after students present list of diversity requirements

Smart Title: 

Protests at campuses nationwide lead to lists of demands, but what happens when a college's Quaker faith rejects the idea of demands?

Black Princeton Professor Raises Issues on Police

A black professor at Princeton University said in several recent posts to social media that she was arrested and mistreated by police over an unpaid parking ticket.

On Twitter Sunday, Imani Perry, an African-American history professor at Princeton, described being pulled over by police in Princeton Township and arrested “for a single parking ticket three years ago.” Police handcuffed her to a table, she said, refused to let her make a call before being arrested and, despite a female officer being present, a male police officer performed a body search.

A spokesman for the police department said Perry was pulled over for speeding, after which it was discovered that her driver’s license had been suspended and there was an active warrant for her arrest due to unpaid parking tickets. "She was put under arrest pursuant to the warrant, our policy and state law," the spokesman said. The police department has opened an investigation into the incident, all of which was recorded. (A local news site collected more details here.)

In a subsequent post to Facebook, Perry elaborated on her feelings about the incident. "I did not purport to be without fault," she wrote. "Now, make no mistake, I do not believe I did anything wrong. But even if I did, my position holds. The police treated me inappropriately and disproportionately. The fact of my blackness is not incidental to this matter."

"Some critics have said that I should have expected what I received. But if it is the standard protocol in an affluent suburb to disallow a member of the community to make a call before an arrest (simply to inform someone of her arrest) and if it is the protocol to have male officers to pat down the bodies of women, and if it is the norm to handcuff someone to a table for failing to pay a parking ticket, we have a serious problem with policing in the society."

Ad keywords: 

Emory & Henry Professor, Citing Protest Fallout, Quits

Delilah White, a visiting assistant professor of mass communications at Emory & Henry College, in Virginia, quit her job last week amid fallout from a campus protest, WCYB News reported. Minority students held a rally at the college last week. White supported the protest, and in a statement quoted by the news outlet, she said fallout from that support made it impossible for her to continue at the college. "After the demonstration on Wednesday, further isolation from colleagues and students ensued from the idea that I was behind the deeds not words movement, bringing me to a breaking point. I cannot function mentally nor physically in a manner that holistically benefits all of our students when I am immersed in an atmosphere of intimidation and prejudice from the majority of students and now, from a host of my colleagues," said the statement.

White could not be reached by Inside Higher Ed.

Via email, Dirk Moore, a spokesman for the college, said, "We did have a professor meet Friday with our president and vice president for academic affairs, asking to be released from her one-year contract. Although, according to a news report, she issued a statement about her reasons for wanting to be released from her contract, I'm not aware of what reasons she may have presented to the president and vice president during their meeting. I only know that they did not ask her to resign and that they accepted her request with sadness and regret."

Ad keywords: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - diversity
Back to Top