diversity

Samford Apologizes for Racist Sorority T-Shirt

The Alpha Delta Pi sorority at Samford University, in Alabama, has angered many on campus and elsewhere by producing a T-shirt featuring a map of the state, with an image depicting a stereotypical black man eating watermelon in one corner of the design. The university says it specifically told the sorority not to produce the T-shirt, but it did so anyway. Images from the shirt (right) have been circulating on social media. R. Philip Kimrey, vice president for student affairs and enrollment management, issued a statement in which he said that the university "apologizes for the offensive image," which he called "completely inconsistent with the university's mission and values." He said that the university would be "following our procedures as quickly as possible" to deal with potential violations of the university's rules.

Ad keywords: 

Seattle U Students Occupy Dean's Office

Students at Seattle University have occupied a dean's office and vowed to stay until their demands are met, The Seattle Times reported. The university says that it has met with and is willing to continue to meet with the students to discuss their demands, and to review the curriculum and other issues. The students have published a list of their demands, including a new curriculum that "decentralizes whiteness and has a critical focus on the evolution of systems of oppression such as racism, capitalism, colonialism, etc., highlighting the art, histories, theologies, political philosophies and socio-cultural transformation of Western and non-Western societies." The students also want the new curriculum to be taught by "prepared staff from marginalized backgrounds, especially professors of color and queer professors," and want all faculty members to be required to go through "training from an antiracist network in Seattle, such as the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond."

Ad keywords: 

SUNY Oswego sees success in diversifying its study abroad population

Smart Title: 

SUNY Oswego has seen success expanding the diversity of its students who study abroad.

As Physician Shortage Approaches, Medical Schools Expand

Since 2002, U.S. medical school enrollment has increased by 25 percent, according to a new report.

The country is facing a physician shortage, and 10 years ago the Association of American Medical Colleges called for a 30 percent increase in enrollment by 2015.

Now, the AAMC’s new report shows that medical schools are responding: 20 new M.D.-granting medical schools have been established since 2002, and the country should reach the 30 percent benchmark by the 2017-18 academic year.

Across the country, medical schools are also more focused on serving diverse health needs. Last year, 84 percent of medical schools had -- or planned to establish -- policies focused on recruiting diverse students who want to work with underserved populations. Another 49 percent are focusing on students from rural communities.

Colleges of osteopathic medicine are also expanding particularly quickly. Using 2002 as a baseline, first-year enrollment in these institutions is expected to grow by 55 percent by 2020.

Ad keywords: 

U.S. finds U of North Carolina in violation of Title IX over treatment of transgender students

Section: 
Smart Title: 

Justice Department tells U of North Carolina that it is violating federal law by enforcing state statute limiting bathrooms transgender people may use.

BU Investigates Racist and Nazi-Themed Posters

Boston University is investigating posters that appeared on campus this week, one of them saying “Black Lives Don’t Matter,” another saying “Atomwaffen Division Massachusetts,” and another featuring an image of a Paul Revere-like figure shouting, “The Nazis Are Coming!” The university's president, Robert A. Brown, released a letter to the campus, calling the posters “a reminder that the human capacity for hate is deeply rooted and never as far from our daily lives as we would like or hope. We also know that the human capacity for healing and renewal in a spirit of generosity and understanding is deeply rooted.”

Ad keywords: 

Confederate Statue Will Be Moved From U of Louisville

The University of Louisville and the city of Louisville announced Friday that a monument (at right) that salutes Confederate soldiers from Kentucky who died in the Civil War will be removed from the university campus and eventually placed elsewhere. “We are not here to erase history, but we are here to announce that this statue should be situated somewhere more appropriate than a modern campus that celebrates its diversity,” said a statement from James Ramsey, the university's president. “Kentucky certainly played a unique role in the Civil War, but it is the culture of inclusion we strive for each day at U of L that will define our future. Over the years, our campus has grown to encircle this monument, which does not symbolize the values of our campus community or that of a 21st-century institution of higher education.”

Many have been pushing for years for the statue's removal. A recent essay by Ricky L. Jones, professor and chair of Pan-African Studies at Louisville, said, "Let me be clear about what the battle flag, statues and other symbols of the Confederacy are. They are representations of hate, emptied-out ideas of racial superiority, inhumanity and devilishness. The Civil War was not a war of 'northern aggression' fought by sympathetic, victimized Gone With the Wind characters. It was a war about slavery -- plain and simple. It was a conflict the South started to maintain its right to continue playing pharaoh and endlessly force its black brutes to make bricks out of straw. Every battle flag, T-shirt and monument to these inhumane traitors reminds us of that fact."

Ad keywords: 

U of Utah scrubs references to antigay groups in biography of honorary degree recipient

Smart Title: 

Students and gay rights groups object to University of Utah plans to award an honorary degree to philanthropist with ties to anti-LGBT organizations. And university didn't win over critics by scrubbing her bio.

A white performer of Hindu chants creates controversy at Brown

Smart Title: 

Why did Brown students protest a white person doing Hindu chants?

MTSU Wants to Drop Nathan Bedford Forrest Name

Middle Tennessee State University has announced plans to change the name of Forrest Hall, which honors Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate military leader who went on, for a time, to be a leader of the Ku Klux Klan. Sidney A. McPhee, president of the university, said he was following the recommendation of a panel appointed to consider the name of Forrest Hall.

“It is clear that there are many wide-ranging and contradicting views about the life and legacy of Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest,” McPhee said in a letter about his decision. “I do not feel it is my role to discern the appropriateness or relevance of his actions prior, during or after the Civil War. It is appropriate, however, for me to assess whether the decision made in the middle of the 20th century to name the building for General Forrest remains in our best interest in the second decade of the 21st century.”

Ad keywords: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - diversity
Back to Top