diversity

Departmental study at Columbia College suggests there are too many female adjuncts over 50

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Departmental self-study at Columbia College in Chicago raises issues about gender and age of adjuncts, leading to charges of bias.

Advice for hiring faculty members with disabilities (essay)

For many disabled scholars, the choices they face when negotiating job market accommodations are deeply complex, fraught and risky, argue Jay Dolmage and Stephanie Kerschbaum.

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Iowa State Latest Campus With Racist Posters

Racists posters appeared Thursday morning at about 20 locations around Iowa State University, the latest university this fall to see such posters. Photos of the posters were posted on social media (right) and alarmed many students and others. The institution took the posters down.

A statement from the university noted that "free expression is fundamental to the educational experience" at the university, but added that the posters violated Iowa State rules. "We continue to defend any individual’s right to free expression; however, attacks directed at any individual or group are inconsistent with the principles of the Iowa State community: respect, purpose, cooperation, richness of diversity, freedom from discrimination and the honest and respectful expression of ideas," the statement said.

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How being likable influences one's progress in academe (essay)

Without that extra push of likability, and often without senior scholars like us who can mentor us along the way, we have to work harder and smarter to succeed in academe, writes Shannon Craigo-Snell.

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Students Plan Protest Over Slur, Lack of Notification

Black students at Florida Gulf Coast University are planning a protest today over the university's failure to respond with a campuswide notification when a threatening slur was found on a classroom whiteboard, The News-Press reported. A statement with a slur suggested that black people should be killed and it was accompanied by a stick figure showing a figure hanging from a tree. Students say the university should have notified them, because many students said they found out about the incident through news reports.

As students were preparing for the protest, President Wilson Bradshaw did send out an all-campus email. "We read about these kinds of things happening on campuses and in other public places across the country, but it is personally distressing to see it here, a place that cares so deeply about and intentionally works so diligently to foster a community that supports each other in our diversity and inclusion," he wrote. Students said that this comment, as they were preparing a protest, did not ease their concerns that they were not notified when the university discovered what was written on the whiteboard.

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Michael Bérubé publishes follow-up to his 1996 book about his son with Down syndrome

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Michael Bérubé publishes follow-up to his 1996 book about his son with Down syndrome. Jamie’s now a working adult who’s offered his dad, who has become a leading figure in disability studies, a whole new education.

Outrage at Xavier U Over Racist Images

Students and administrators at Xavier University in Ohio are denouncing two racist images linked to students at Xavier and circulating on social media. One shows a woman in blackface with the tagline "who needs white when black lives matter." The other appears to show an African garment over a skeleton next to a banner supporting Donald Trump.

The Reverend Michael J. Graham posted a statement on Twitter in which he said, in part, "I am outraged and deeply troubled by recent racist images connected to Xavier students. Racist actions are unacceptable on our campus, and we have mechanisms to respond in a responsible and thoughtful manner. When one of us falls short, we all fall short." He added that "many of our students, of all races, are in pain" over the images.

The images in question follow.

Southern Idaho Pays $650K to Settle Ex-VP's Bias Suit

The College of Southern Idaho has agreed to pay $650,000 to settle a lawsuit in which a former vice president claimed she faced discrimination as a woman and an immigrant. Edit Szanto was placed on involuntary leave from Southern Idaho in 2014 after a total of 17 years at the institution, most recently as vice president for student services. She claimed in complaints to state and federal agencies and eventually in a federal lawsuit that the university treated her unfairly because of her gender and because she was foreign born.

In a statement, Idaho State said the settlement -- which was paid by its insurer -- did not admit any wrongdoing and would "limit the costs and distraction associated with lengthy litigation." (Note: This article has been corrected to identify the College of Southern Idaho as the institution in the settlement.)

Political Science Group's Report Examines Inequality

Political science has faced criticism as a discipline for not paying enough attention to the causes and consequences of inequality, beyond rising income inequality and its effect on political representation. A major new report from the American Political Science Association, under the direction of Rodney Hero, association president and professor of political science at the University of California, Berkeley, begins to address some of those concerns.

The Double Bind: The Politics of Racial and Class Inequalities in the Americas” examines the how race and class shape inequalities throughout the Americas and how countries respond to them, for better or worse. A major finding is that racial and ethnic minorities struggle to translate their demographic potential and political activity into meaningful socioeconomic gains due to low socioeconomic status, along with political party incentives. That’s true even in countries where minorities make up a large proportion of the active voters, according to the report.

“The report provides us with an excellent framework for thinking critically about the ways in which the racial and economic inequalities that we currently see in the Americas are the legacies of settler colonialism, slavery and the exclusionary politics that shaped the development of the entire region,” said Alvin J. Tillery Jr., associate professor of political science at Northwestern University and co-chair of the report task force, said in a statement. “It also shows that governments can develop policies to begin to ameliorate these inequalities under the right mix of conditions.” Report chapters include “Race, Partisanship and the Rise of Income Inequality in the United States” and “Learning From Ferguson: Welfare, Criminal Justice and the Political Science of Race and Class,” as well as several on Latin America and Canada.

Conference spotlights effort to send more students from minority-serving institutions abroad

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At Generation Study Abroad summit, panelists discuss how to get a more diverse group of students abroad, including students enrolled at minority-serving institutions.

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