diversity

Florida Atlantic professor criticized after his essays blaming "black supremacy" for slavery surface

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Florida Atlantic professor faces opposition from students after his essays blaming "black supremacy" for slavery and generally defending the Confederacy surface.

Why the titles of race courses matter (opinion)

Aptly titled courses and robust descriptions teach students a valuable lesson in speaking uncomfortable racial truths to white power, argues Ted Thornhill.

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Diversity Newsletter publication date: 
Tuesday, April 10, 2018
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The Politics of Race Course Titles

Men Likelier Than Women to Say They're Smarter Than Peers

Is intelligence a state of mind, dependent on gender? A new study in Advances in Physiology Education involving students in an undergraduate biology course says men see themselves as smarter than women do, even when they share the same grades. Researchers at Arizona State University asked students in the class to compare their intelligence with that of their classmates in general, and with one person with whom they worked closely in the course. Male students were 3.2 times more likely than women to say they were smarter than their partners, the paper says. A male student with a 3.3 grade point average is likely to say that he is smarter than 66 percent of his classmates, while a woman with the same GPA is likely to say she’s smarter than 54 percent of her peers, based on an advanced analysis. 

Researchers also found that students were more likely to report participating in class more than their partner if they had a higher academic “self-concept.” The findings “suggest that student characteristics can influence students’ academic self-concept, which in turn may influence their participation in small-group discussion and their academic achievement in active learning classes,” the paper says, especially as more and more biology courses move away from lectures to active learning. Non-native speakers of English also reported lower levels of academic self-concept than native speakers.

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Equity Gaps in College Spending

Education spending for students of color who attend public colleges in the United States trails spending on white students by an average of more than $1,000 per year, according to a new analysis from the Center for American Progress. Nationwide, the aggregate spending gap is roughly $5 billion per year.

Two primary factors contribute to this equity problem, the report said. Most states provide more financial support to research universities than to less selective community colleges and four-year institutions. And CAP said the "inequitable system of access to higher education" tends to disproportionally send students of color to the colleges that receive less funding.

"It is imperative that states, institutions and policy makers work together to improve the current system of college admissions and access to ensure the system does not sort students into institutions based on factors that are beyond their control," the report concludes. "Until the doors of opportunity are open to everyone, inequity will persist, and students of color will continue to be shortchanged at every level."

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Author discusses his new book on gay student activism on Christian college campuses

Author discusses his new book about gay students and LGBT activism at Christian colleges.

KIPP charter school alumni more likely to report 'sense of belonging' at HBCUs

New findings show Knowledge Is Power Program alumni who attend historically black colleges are more likely to report a “sense of belonging” and good mental health than those who attend other colleges.

Author discusses her new book about how U.S. laws led to growth in female enrollments

Author discusses her new book, which argues that federal laws that weren't focused on gender led to rise in female enrollments in higher education.

University of Michigan removes honors for late president and professor with racist legacies

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University of Michigan will rename two buildings -- one honoring a late president and the other a late professor -- after research showed them both to have promoted bigoted ideas.

Virginia Tech women's lacrosse team accused of racism after clip of players goes viral

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Virginia Tech's women's lacrosse team has come under fire for singing a song with a repeated racial slur, leading many to say the incident highlights a lack of diversity in the game.

Women's Lacrosse Players Sing N-Word

A video circulating online shows members of the women's lacrosse team at Virginia Tech singing the N-word multiple times as they ride in a bus back from a victory. They are apparently singing a song by a white rapper featuring the slur.

John Sung, the coach, told The Roanoke Times that team members were apologetic and that he had met with them to discuss the matter.

“This is a teachable moment,” Sung told the newspaper. “It’s not something that we’re proud of. The team is very apologetic and sorry. There’s nobody of any color that should say it. Period. There’s nobody that should say it.”

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