diversity

UCLA grad students stage sit-in during a class to protest what they see as racially hostile climate

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Grad students at UCLA use rare tactic of interrupting a course, setting off debate over whether this was necessary to combat racial insensitivity or took away rights of other students and a professor.

Study documents impact of state bans on affirmative action

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Study finds evidence that state bans on consideration of race in admissions have a significant impact – and one that extended to some nearby states without bans.

Project-based learning could help attract and retain women in STEM, study suggests

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One college unexpectedly found that female engineering students responded particularly well to its project-based learning approach. Experts say the curriculum could help attract and retain women in the STEM fields.

Black Michigan Students Tweet Concerns: #BBUM

The Black Student Union at the University of Michigan has urged its members to describe the issues they face via Twitter and the hashtag #BBUM (for "Being Black at the University of Michigan") is generating discussion at Michigan and elsewhere. Among the tweets: BBUM "is working in study groups and your answer to the question always requires a double check before approval" and "is being the only black person in class, and having other races look at you to be the spokesperson whenever black history is brought up" and "I'm afraid to wear my natural hair ... because I don't want to deal with the questions." The university responded on the hashtag with: "Thanks for engaging in this conversation. We’re listening, and will be sure all of your voices are heard."

This month a black student at the University of California at Los Angeles set off a debate about race with his YouTube video about the experience of being black there.

 

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Texas Republicans Cancel 'Catch an Illegal Immigrant' Game

After distancing campus administrators from a "catch an illegal immigrant" game put on by the University of Texas at Austin's Young Conservatives of Texas chapter, UT President Bill Powers supported the group's decision to cancel the event Tuesday. "The University of Texas at Austin honors the right of free speech for all students," Powers said in a statement. "We welcome the Young Conservatives of Texas' decision to cancel Wednesday's event and look forward to the group being part of a thoughtful campus discussion about immigration."

The event, which drew criticism online, was planned for Wednesday. To raise awareness of illegal immigration, the event organizer said, students would search the campus for people wearing clothes that said "illegal immigrant," then apprehend them to win a $25 gift card.

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Texas Students Plan 'Catch an Illegal Immigrant' Game

The University of Texas at Austin’s Young Conservatives of Texas chapter says its planned “catch an illegal immigrant game” is designed to raise awareness about illegal immigration, but the idea caused a stir online Monday. Planned for Wednesday afternoon, the game involves students running around campus to apprehend “several people walking around” with the words “illegal immigrant” displayed on their clothing.

“Any UT student who catches one of these 'illegal immigrants' and brings them back to our table will receive a $25 gift card,” the event Facebook page says. “The purpose of this event is to spark a campus-wide discussion about the issue of illegal immigration, and how it affects our everyday lives.” More than 220 people have confirmed their plans to attend on Facebook, but at least one commenter said she only “joined” the event so she could write comments opposing it.

Texas President Bill Powers said in a statement that the event is "completely out of line" with the university's values. "Our nation continues to grapple with difficult questions surrounding immigration," Powers said. "I ask YCT to be part of that discussion but to find more productive and respectful ways to do so that do not demean their fellow students."

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Bob Jones U. Devotes Week of Chapel to Same-Sex Issues

Bob Jones University, an evangelical institution that bars any sex outside of heterosexual marriage, devoted last week's four chapel services to gay issues. The decision to do so prompted much speculation and debate on social media. Randy Page, director of public relations at the university, said via email that the decision to focus on same-sex attraction came at the request of students. During one of the services, Stephen Jones, president of Bob Jones, told the students about a "totally inappropriate letter" received by one student who may be gay. Jones told "the student body that the sentiments expressed represented nothing of the spirit of Christ and would not be accepted here," Page said.

BJUnity, a group promoting equity for gay students at Bob Jones, called the chapel services "a farce," and noted that the university has never apologized for hostile statements made in the past by university leaders.

 

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Lehigh Students Protest Vandalism of Multicultural Dorm

More than 1,000 people rallied on the Lehigh University campus to protest vandalism found at the multicultural dorm Wednesday night, Lehigh Valley Live reported. Early Wednesday morning, someone threw eggs at the residence hall and spray-painted derogatory terms on and around the buildings. The rally was led by a student group calling itself From Beneath the Rug, which formed this year to "represent and fight for marginalized groups on campus and people who feel like their voices aren't and should be heard," one member said.

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Costume Controversy at Washington U. St. Louis

Some students at Washington University in St. Louis are condemning a Halloween costume, photos of which have circulated online, showing students as U.S. soldiers standing over a student who is playing a Muslim, The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported. The student playing the Muslim has a fake beard and turban, and critics say the image perpetuates stereotypes.

 

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Colleges in Indiana Oppose Ban on Same-Sex Marriage

DePauw University and Wabash Colleges have followed Indiana University in joining Freedom Indiana, which is opposing a proposal that Indiana amend its constitution to ban same-sex marriage. A joint statement from the DePauw and Wabash presidents, Brian W. Casey and Gregory D. Hess, respectively, gave the following rationale: "Our students come from around the country and around the world, and our fundamental goal is to educate them to think critically, exercise responsible leadership, communicate effectively, and tackle complex problems. This depends on attracting talented faculty and staff, a task that is made more difficult by the passage of this amendment. We are also engaged in the enterprise of fostering ideas and innovation, a mission which inherently depends on an environment of openness and inclusion that would be compromised should this amendment be enacted."

 

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