diversity

'#CommunicationSoWhite'

Nonwhite scholars continue to be underrepresented in publication and citation rates and editorial positions in communication studies, according to a new paper called "#CommunicationSoWhite" in the Journal of Communication by researchers at New York University. Coding and analyzing the racial composition of primary authors of articles in 12 disciplinary research journals from 1990 to 2016, along with citations, the new study’s authors found that nonwhite scholars were almost absent from publications as recently as the 1990s. Representation increased to 6 percent by the end of 1990 and to 12 percent by the end of 2010, but nonwhite first authors are still cited significantly fewer times than their white counterparts. The only exception is for articles about race.

"If we truly value research produced by faculty of color, and are serious about promoting their scholarly and professional success and advancement, we must make a conscious effort to make sure our citation practices reflect this," Charlton McIlwain, co-author and an associate professor of media, culture and communication at NYU, said in a statement.

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How to avoid bias in faculty evaluations (opinion)

W. Carson Byrd suggests some first steps to take to combat student biases in teaching evaluations.

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Tuesday, May 8, 2018
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From Potential Bias to Action

Private sector lenders ready to expand into graduate loan market

Private-sector companies say they're ready to expand footprint in student loan market (again) as they push for new caps on federal lending to graduate students.

New Brown University student group trying to diversify campus speakers, politics

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While the university has been known as a place where students shouted down a speaker, administrators are trying to shake that image, and a new student group has launched to diversify the types of speakers who visit.

Economist to Lead Harvard School of Education

Bridget Terry Long, a scholar who studies the economics of higher education, will become the next dean of Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, succeeding James E. Ryan, who is stepping down to become president of the University of Virginia.

Long was HGSE's academic dean from 2013 to 2017 and the faculty director of the research doctoral program from 2010 to 2013.

She specializes in research related to college access and affordability, studying the role of financial aid, the effects of postsecondary remediation and the impact of institutional initiatives aimed at reducing inequality in outcomes.

Long’s research has on occasion departed from conventional wisdom, as with a 2010 paper she co-authored that found that using adjunct professors to teach classes can have a positive effect on enrollment patterns, especially in fields related to particular occupations.

The paper, published in The Review of Economics and Statistics, found that taking a class from an adjunct often increases the number of subsequent courses that a student takes in that subject and may also increase the likelihood that the student majors in the subject.

Long and co-author Eric P. Bettinger found that adjunct instructors may also be especially effective in fields that are more directly tied to professions, such as education and engineering. They found that adjuncts had relatively positive effects in the sciences as well.

The researchers noted that many adjuncts have professional experience “and may have significant prior to concurrent industry experience."

Another study she co-authored, published in 2012 in The Quarterly Journal of Economics, found that low-income high school seniors whose parents got help filling out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid were more likely to complete two years of college.

In a statement, Harvard said Long is currently studying the influence of information on college preparation and enrollment activities.

A native of Baltimore, she earned master’s and doctoral degrees in economics from Harvard and a bachelor’s degree from Princeton University. Long joined the Harvard faculty as an assistant professor in 2000.

A research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, she is also a member and former chair of the U.S. Department of Education’s National Board for Education Sciences. President Barack Obama appointed Long to the board in 2010, and she chaired it from 2011 to 2013.

Long is a board director for MDRC, the nonprofit policy research group created in 1974 by the Ford Foundation. She is also a member of the Massachusetts Public Education Nominating Council.

Long will become dean in July, when Ryan steps down.

 

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Large study finds colleges that go test optional become more diverse and maintain academic quality

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New study finds that ending SAT and ACT requirements results in more applications and more diversity -- without any decline in graduation rates.

The racial exclusions in scholarly citations (opinion)

The lack of citations of scholars of color furthers racial dominance and forecloses potentially valuable avenues of intellectual inquiry, argues Victor Ray.

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Tuesday, May 1, 2018
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The Racial Politics of Citation

Montana State's Faculty Senate narrowly votes down proposed economics research center to be funded by Charles Koch Foundation

Montana State's Faculty Senate narrowly votes down proposed economics research center to be funded by an active Charles Koch Foundation grant.

Pentagon opposes GOP bill over loan forgiveness

As Republicans seek support for their controversial legislation to update the Higher Education Act, a Pentagon document gives ammo to critics over the bill's plan to end Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

Southern Illinois proposal that alumni volunteers do faculty work doesn't go over well

Southern Illinois Carbondale's proposal that alumni volunteers do faculty work (without pay) doesn't go over well.

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