Accreditor Effectively Shuts College for Native Americans

American Indian College, which describes itself as the nation's only private college for Native American students, will teach out its 91 students and close its doors after having its accreditation withdrawn by the Higher Learning Commission, the Phoenix institution's president said Monday.

The commission, which accredits institutions in 19 mostly Midwestern states, determined that the tiny onetime Bible college had addressed some of the concerns that resulted in its being placed on probation by the commission in October 2013. But the accrediting group cited continuing concerns about the college's financial situation, including long-term debt of $2.9 million and "insufficient overall revenue generation and fundamental financial weakness in the college’s finances." HLC ordered American Indian officials to develop a plan by next week to teach out its remaining students.

The college's current president, David Moore, led the institution from 1975 to 1994 and returned in June 2013 to try to get it back on track. He said he was "surprised and disappointed" that the commission voted to withdraw accreditation, especially because an "institutional action committee" established by the accreditor had recommended that the college continue on probation rather than lose its accreditation. The college has not missed any payments on its debt since Moore returned, he said, enrollment has climbed and the college's lender is "very happy" because the institution's campus and assets were recently valued at $9 million.

But Moore said the institution would not appeal the HLC or sue to try to have it reversed. The college will submit a plan today to have another institution (which he declined to identify) help its current students finish their educations, Moore said. "They've made their decision, and we will move forward."

HLC also placed two other institutions on probation: Wentworth Military Academy and College, in Missouri, and Cankdeska Cikana Community College, in North Dakota.

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Maryland says collaboration, not merger, best solution to end higher education discrimination

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Maryland officials call a proposal to merge a commuter institution with a HBCU a "far-reaching, risky scheme," arguing instead that joint degree programs can better end decades of racial inequity among the state's public colleges.

Latest developments in campus racial protests and responses to those protests

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1,000 complaints to U.S. Education Department in seven years; Brown releases $100 million plan to promote inclusiveness; Occidental sit-in ends after six days.

Protests and controversies over race proliferate on campuses

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Princeton agrees to consider changing role of Woodrow Wilson name on campus; white student union surfaces (online) at Illinois; black ministers want Kean president to quit; Smith students exclude journalists; Towson president signs list of demands; and more.

Black students criticize racism protests organized by white students

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Demonstrations against racism at two universities were canceled after black students complained about the rallies being organized without their involvement.

Cambridge Drops Video With Controversial Historian

The University of Cambridge has dropped a fund-raising video because many objected to its inclusions of David Starkey, a noted historian of Tudor England whose comments on modern society have been criticized as racist by many, The Telegraph reported. An open letter to the university said that including Starkey made many other alumni uncomfortable about being featured in the video or contributing to the fund-raising campaign. Cambridge officials said that they always planned to take down the video, but did so early because of concerns they were hearing. Starkey told the Telegraph: “I was asked to contribute by the university, which I love, and to which I owe a profound debt. In due course, the university will decide what is right, proper and expedient. I shall be happy to accept that decision."

As campus protests continue, Princeton becomes flashpoint with debate over Woodrow Wilson

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Princeton becomes flash point in campus protests as students demand end to links to Woodrow Wilson. The same day, institution ends the use of "master" to describe leaders of residential colleges.

Yale President Vows New Efforts to Promote Diversity

Yale President Peter Salovey announced Tuesday that the university will undertake a series of new efforts to promote an inclusive environment on campus. Among the steps he outlined: adding faculty positions on underrepresented groups and doubling the budgets for campus cultural centers that focus on various groups. He also pledged that he, "along with the vice presidents, deans, provosts and other members of the administration, will receive training on recognizing and combating racism and other forms of discrimination in the academy."

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Protests at Still More Campuses

Protests over race and diversity continued to spread Monday, with actions at numerous campuses:

  • At Occidental College, students took over parts of an administration building to demand the creation of a black studies major and the hiring of more minority faculty members, The Los Angeles Times reported.
  • At Iowa State University, students and faculty members held a rally to support black students at the University of Missouri, and to draw attention to their concerns about experiencing racism on campus, The Ames Tribune reported.
  • At Niagara University, students walked out of classes to hold a rally on issues of racism and inequality, The Niagara Gazette reported.
  • At the University of South Carolina, about 150 students walked out of class and held a protest to demand that the university do more to promote diversity, The State reported.
  • In Boston, students from 17 colleges held a march against racial injustices, blocking traffic at some points in their protest, Boston.com reported.
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U of York Apologizes for Statement on 'Men's Day'

The University of York, in Britain, has apologized for a press release announcing that it would celebrate "International Men's Day" this week. Many critics said that the university's support for the day suggested a lack of awareness of the many inequities facing women in academe. The university's apology said that "the main focus of gender equality work should continue to be on the inequalities faced by women, and in particular the underrepresentation of women in the professoriate and senior management."


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