diversity

Princeton professor who was criticized for using N-word in class on hate speech cancels course

Princeton professor who was criticized for using the word in a class on hate speech cancels the course.

Education Department No Longer Pursuing Bathroom Complaints From Transgender Students

The Department of Education will not take action on civil rights complaints filed by transgender students blocked from using the bathroom matching their gender identity, BuzzFeed News reported Monday.

The website quoted department spokeswoman Liz Hill, who said it was the Education Department's position that bathroom complaints are not covered by Title IX. But Hill in an email said "there is nothing new here" and that the department's position has been that gender identity isn't covered by Title IX since Secretary Betsy DeVos last year withdrew Obama administration guidelines issued to protect the rights of transgender students.

The guidelines were issued to ensure those students had access to bathrooms and other facilities of their choice, but DeVos argued those issues were best handled at the state level and said the guidance had given rise to legal disputes over the issue.

A memo from acting Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights Candice Jackson to regional officials last June clarified that investigators should continue to evaluate complaints for sex discrimination under Title IX, whether or not an individual was transgender. That document did not, however, mention whether access to bathrooms matching a student's gender identity would fall under the type of complaint officials should investigate.

Hill's statement to BuzzFeed clarifies that the department does not necessarily consider access to bathrooms based on gender identity a civil rights issue under Title IX.

“Where students, including transgender students, are penalized or harassed for failing to conform to sex-based stereotypes, that is sex discrimination prohibited by Title IX,” Hill told the site. “In the case of bathrooms, however, long-standing regulations provide that separating facilities on the basis of sex is not a form of discrimination prohibited by Title IX.”

Ad keywords: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 
Ad keyword: 
Civil Rights

Teaching evaluations are often used to confirm the worst stereotypes about women faculty (opinion)

Such evaluations pretend to be the result of a neutral process but are better measures of student stereotypes than teaching effectiveness, argues Victor Ray.

Job Tags: 
Ad keywords: 
Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 
Image Size: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Newsletter Order: 
3
Diversity Newsletter publication date: 
Tuesday, February 13, 2018
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Email Teaser: 
Is Gender Bias an Intended Feature of Teaching Evaluations?

Instructor suspended for using N-word in class

Section: 

Instructor suspended after using slur. Does it matter if he was singing along to a song a student played in class?

Scholar sets off Twitter furor by critiquing a book he hasn't read

Section: 

Scholar at respected professional organization sets off Twitter furor by questioning new book on technology and discrimination that he later admitted he hadn't read. 

White supremacist group angers many at Colorado State and University of Tennessee

Section: 

At Colorado State, skirmishes follow a speech, and anger follows anti-immigrant posters. At Tennessee, concerns arise over a room booked under apparently false pretenses. Colorado State president issues statement saying, "A Nazi is a Nazi is a Nazi."

U Toronto Publishes '10,000 Ph.D.s Project'

Roughly one-third of Ph.D.s who graduated from the University of Toronto between 2000 and 2015 hold tenure-track or tenured positions in academe, according to a major study of outcomes by the institution’s School of Graduate Studies. Sixty percent of graduates over all work in academe. The share of Ph.D.s working in business is increasing: some 13 percent of 2000 graduates ended up in the private sector, compared to 23 percent of graduates in 2015. Researchers were able to obtain employment information for 88 percent of nearly 10,000 Ph.D.s using open-access data sources, such as official university and company websites. More data are available here.

Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Kenyon professor calls off play amid criticism that it's culturally insensitive

Section: 

Kenyon professor calls off original play about cultural insensitivity amid criticism that it's culturally insensitive.

Scholars Defend Stanford Professor Receiving Threats

Nearly 600 supporters of David Palumbo-Liu, the Louise Hewlett Nixon Professor and professor of comparative literature at Stanford University, have signed an open letter asking his institution to “enunciate a strict code of ethics for journalists, distinguishing between opinion pieces and news reporting.” The letter was prompted by a recent article in an independent student newspaper, The Stanford Review, about Palumbo-Liu’s affiliation with the Campus Antifascist Network, calling it “undeniably a chapter of a terrorist group” that embraces “vigilante thuggery.” Fox News picked up the piece, as did several right-wing websites, and Palumbo-Liu says he’s since received graphic death threats and other hate mail from across the country.

The Campus Antifascist Network was formed in part to organize protests against racist demonstrations on college campuses. And while some members of the international “antifa” movement embrace violence as a protest tool, Palumbo-Liu told the Review that the network does not. The open letter says, in part, that “The Review provides no evidence whatsoever for their claim that Palumbo-Liu is a member of a terrorist organization. Such reckless and inflammatory statements violate not only journalistic standards but also Stanford's Fundamental Standard, and they ultimately endanger all of us.” The Review responded to criticism from Palumbo-Liu in a follow-up piece called “If It Quacks Like a Duck …” A spokesperson for Stanford said a review is under way and that the institution is “closely monitoring the situation.”

Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

U Wisconsin Campuses Investigated Nearly 100 Sexual Misconduct Cases Involving Employees Since 2014

University of Wisconsin campuses have investigated nearly 100 formal complaints of sexual misconduct against employees who teach, advise or otherwise supervise students since 2014, according to an investigation by the Journal-Sentinel. More than half the complaints involved allegations of professors or instructors harassing or assaulting students, based on records from campuses that provided such information. At least half of the campus investigations resulted in findings that an employee had violated university policies or in a warning or referral to sexual harassment misconduct training. The systems’ Milwaukee campuses had the most formal investigations, at 34. Madison, the flagship, had seven.

"Our campus communities should be safe and welcoming places to live, learn and work -- and there is no room for compromise on this commitment," Ray Cross, system president, told the Journal Sentinel. “We are focused on changing the culture on our campuses and beyond so victims feel empowered to come forward.”

The Madison campus in particular is reportedly working on a centralized reporting system, because complaints are now made through different offices and many are resolved informally. 

Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Disable left side advertisement?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - diversity
Back to Top