diversity

Study: Hispanic College-Going Rate Tops White Rate

An all-time high of 69 percent of Hispanics graduating from high school in 2012 enrolled in college that fall, according to analysis by the Pew Research Center. This is a greater proportion than that of white graduates from the same class, of whom 67 percent enrolled in college.

According to Pew, Hispanic college-going has seen a long-term increase, especially since the recession hit, whereas enrollment by white high school graduates has gradually declined since 2008.

In addition, the high school dropout rate among Hispanic 16 to 24-year-olds has been cut in half since 2000, when it was 28 percent, compared to 14 percent currently. The white high school dropout rate has also declined, albeit only two percentage points and from a lower base (7 percent to 5 percent).

Recent High School Dropouts (numbers in thousands)

Race/ethnicity 1999-2000 2011-2012
Hispanic 101 134
White 384 197
Black 111 124
Asian (unavailable) 19

Ratio of High School Completers to Dropouts

Race/ethnicity 1999-2000 2011-2012
Hispanic 3:1 5:1
White 6:1 12:1
Black 4:1 4:1
Asian (unavailable) 9:1

(Both tables from Pew Research Center)

Although they surpass white students in the percentage of high school graduates enrolling in college, Pew added, Hispanic graduates still lag behind in some aspects; for instance, Hispanic high school graduates have a 56 percent likelihood of enrolling in a four-year college, as compared to 72 percent for white graduates. They are also less likely than whites to be full-time students or earn a bachelor's degree.

Pew offers two possible explanations for the increased Hispanic enrollment: the worsening job market (unemployment among Hispanics 16-24 has increased seven percentage points post-recession, compared to five points among whites) and the emphasis Hispanic families are likely to place on a college education (according to two separate 2009 Pew surveys, 88 percent of Hispanics 16 and over agreed that a college degree is necessary for success, compared to 74 percent of Americans overall who said that).

 

 

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Report Urges More Help for Women at Community Colleges

A new report from the American Association of University Women makes several recommendations for furthering women’s success in community colleges, a goal the report calls “too often overlooked.”  Based on their research, authors Andresse St. Rose and Catherine Hill make two primary recommendations: “Support student parents” and “Increase the number of women in nontraditional fields, including STEM.”

"While we celebrate the accessibility that community colleges provide women … access alone is not enough," St. Rose said in a conference call Thursday.

According to the report, women make up 57 percent of the students who attend community colleges; many of these women are financially limited and/or academically underprepared, and about 25 percent have children. As such, the report recommends increases in on-campus child care at community colleges, which is offered at fewer than half of such institutions.

The report also singles out the Career Pathways Initiative (CPI), a program for low-income parents offered at all of Arkansas' community colleges, for praise. CPI offers assistance to low-income parents through a combination of tutoring, academic advising and career services. "More schools and states need to follow this example," St. Rose said during the call.

Associate Degrees Conferred by Community Colleges, by Gender, 2009–2010

Major Women Men
Health professions and related programs 84,526 15,778
Education 11,577 2,877
Computer and information sciences 3,359 10,860
Engineering technologies 2,628 15,629
Personal and culinary services 2,500 1,560
Mechanic and repair technologies/technicians 785 11,332
Mathematics and statistics 317 690
Engineering 282 1,902
Construction trades 210 3,073

Source: AAUW analysis of U.S. Department of Education, 2010.

St. Rose and Hill also call for expanded information and support for women seeking degrees in STEM fields; women enrolled in community colleges, they say, currently tend toward traditionally female fields such as nursing, education and cosmetology, and are therefore underrepresented in STEM-related areas (see table). Their recommendations on this include more active recruitment, ensuring that academic advising programs are not reinforcing gender stereotypes and bolstering the gender equity provisions found in the Perkins Act, which provides federal support for technical education.

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New papers suggest summer outreach can help low-income rising freshmen

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Two new Harvard papers indicate outreach to low-income students in the summer before college can have a significant impact on whether they enroll.

Parsons calls off master class by John Galliano

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Parsons calls off master class by John Galliano, the designer widely condemned as anti-Semitic, saying he would not agree on a "frank discussion" of his career.

Academic Minute: Skin Color and Racism

In today’s Academic Minute, JeffriAnne Wilder of the University of North Florida explains the continued existence of colorism and skin tone bias within minority communities. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

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Colgate U. Returns Aboriginal Art to Australia

Colgate University will today formally transfer ownership of more than 100 pieces of art to Curtin University, in Australia, The New York Times reported. The collection consists of paintings and drawings by Aboriginal children who were living in a settlement camp in Australia in the 1940s and 1950s. The art is considered by experts to be "so distinctive and so technically sophisticated that it received considerable acclaim when it toured Europe in the 1950s," the Times reported. The collection came to Colgate when an alumnus donated it in 1966, but most of the art has been out of view. Colgate officials said that they saw the transfer as a just tribute to the artists and a way to build ties to an Australian university.

 

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How Did Orthodox Rabbinic College Win $10.6M in Public Funds?

Some legislators and civil liberties groups are asking why Governor Chris Christie's administration in New Jersey is planning to award $10.6 million in funds from a voter approved bond issue for college facilities to Beth Medrash Govoha, an all-male, orthodox rabbinical seminary, The Star-Ledger reported. The article notes increasingly close ties between the college's leaders and the Christie administration. The bond vote explicitly included private colleges, and many private colleges in New Jersey have religious affiliations. Critics say that Beth Medrash Govoha -- unlike the Roman Catholic colleges in New Jersey -- appears to have religious tests for admission. College officials deny any religious tests. But critics say that requirements -- such as knowing Hebrew, knowing sacred Jewish texts and agreeing not to date for the first six months enrolled -- suggest a strong religious orientation for all students.

 

Smith Clarifies Position on Transgender Applicants

Smith College has been receiving criticism over reports (not confirmed by the college) that a transgender applicant was rejected (although some of those reports suggest that the prospective student's application was returned for more information and not rejected). The college has for many years stated that students who are admitted to Smith may complete their educations, even if they are transgender and start identifying as such while enrolled, despite having presented themselves differently at the time of admission. But until recently, the college's statement on sexual identity said this about admission: "Is Smith still a women's college? Absolutely. As a women's college, Smith only considers female applicants for undergraduate admission." Now, however, the college's statement reads this way: "How does Smith decide who is a woman? It doesn’t. With regard to admission, Smith relies upon the information provided by each student applicant. In other contexts, different definitions and requirements may apply. For example, the definition of a woman for NCAA competition may differ from the definition of a woman for purposes of admission to Smith or other single-sex colleges."

Debra Shaver, dean of admission, said via e-mail that the new statement didn't mean the policy had changed. "We clarified how we consider transgender applicants; we're being more transparent. This is the same practice we've used for more than a decade," she said.

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Study finds black and Latino grad students borrow more to earn Ph.D.s

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Study finds that black and Latino students borrow more than others do to earn doctorates in STEM and social science fields.

USC Students Accuse LAPD of Racial Profiling

University of Southern California students are alleging that the more than 70 Los Angeles Police Department officers who responded to a noise complaint and broke up a house party early Sunday morning engaged in racial profiling, The Daily Trojan reported. While police came in with riot gear and batons, those students said, a large house party attended primarily by white students remained undisturbed. Police say some of the 400-or-so students – most of whom were black or Latino, and six of whom were arrested – became aggressive and threw bottles at them, which students denied. One student who attended the celebratory graduation party posted a petition afterward titled “Stop Racial Profiling at USC!”, which had gathered nearly 2,000 signatures as of early Monday evening. The television station KTLA reported that LAPD will investigate the allegation internally.

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