diversity

Efforts to Boost Latino Student Success

Excelencia in Education has released a new report, "Growing What Works" that highlights relatively small and affordable programs started at various colleges that have had a significant impact on improving retention and graduation among Latino students. The idea of the report is to spread the news about concrete successes various colleges have had.

 

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Mills College Settles Disability Dispute

Mills College has settled a disability complaint by federal officials by agreeing to make 368 changes in facilities by 2014, with additional projects to be completed by 2017 and then 2023, the Bay Area News Group reported. Federal officials had identified inaccessible facilities ranging from bathrooms to drinking fountains to parking to lecture halls. When the various commitments are completed, all lecture halls, auditoriums and the gym will be fully wheelchair accessible.

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UNC Accused of Underreporting Sexual Assault Cases

A group of students and a former dean filed a complaint last week with the Education Department's Office for Civil Rights, alleging that the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill violated a series of federal laws protecting the rights of sexual assault survivors, The Huffington Post and The Daily Tar Heel student newspaper reported. Melinda Manning, the former associate dean of students who reportedly resigned over the institution's handling of sexual assault cases, said the individuals who run the campus judicial system did not receive adequate training for the job and mistreated victims, asking inappropriate questions and blaming victims. The complaint says upper-level administrators pressured Manning to underreport sexual assault statistics to the federal government and discouraged her from approaching Chancellor Holden Thorp about her concerns.

The complaint, filed on behalf of 64 assault victims, says UNC violated the Campus Sexual Assault Victims' Bill of Rights, the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

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Congressman Attacks NEH Grant on Muslim Cultures

Representative Walter B. Jones, a North Carolina Republican, is attacking a grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities to Craven Community College, in North Carolina. The grant is quite modest -- 25 books and a DVD -- but Jones objects to the subject matter. The materials are about Muslim cultures (and similar grants are being given to other colleges for their libraries). In a statement, Jones said: "It is appalling to me that a federal agency like NEH is wasting taxpayer money on programs like this. It makes zero sense for the U.S. government to borrow money from China in order to promote the culture of Islamic civilizations." (The grant announcement does not state that it is "promoting" Islamic cultures, only encouraging more understanding of them.)

Jones also called for the community college to assure "balance" if it accepts the grant by adding materials on "Christianity and America’s rich Judeo-Christian heritage." The Craven-Pamlico Christian Coalition then issued a statement that it "would be pleased to provide a series of materials about the history of Christianity to the Craven Community College. However, in light of the government’s role in keeping God out of the public square and the obstacles that Christians face when it comes to prayer and the ability to publicly proclaim our faith, it just seems more than odd that the federal government will provide a package of 'Muslim Journeys' to a number of colleges nationwide. It’s even more perplexing knowing the fiscal problems facing our nation."

A local newspaper, The New Bern Sun Journal, ran an editorial stating that Jones was being unfair in his criticism of the grant. "The materials funded by the NEH grant are intended to teach about Islamic culture, something that would be useful in a community where many residents find themselves deployed to Islamic nations."

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Dixie State Seeks to Keep 'Dixie' in Its Name

Dixie State College's board has voted to request a name change to Dixie State University, but not to abandon the "Dixie" portion of its name. The institution is located in a part of Utah settled by immigrants from the South who embraced the Dixie name and Confederate imagery. As the college debating becoming a university, some affiliated with the university said that it would be a good time to change its name entirely, and to end associations that some saw as exclusionary.

Steven G. Caplin, the board chair, issued a statement: "As with stakeholders at large, the trustees saw the merits of several different naming options, and the majority preferred 'Dixie State University.' In the end the board chose to unite as one body. We unanimously stand behind the Dixie State University name and encourage all stakeholders to do the same. This is the time to combine our resources, make our best contributions, and rally around this great institution."

Roi Wilkins, a senior at the college who is African-American, told The Salt Lake Tribune that the college was ignoring the extent to which its name is associated with oppression. "I feel like they’re still trying to sweep it under the rug," he said.

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Debate Over Christian Law School in Canada

The Council of Canadian Law Deans is opposing a proposal by Trinity Western University, an evangelical institution, to start a law school, The Vancouver Sun reported. The deans say that the accreditor for law schools in Canada should block the new institution from opening because Trinity Western's policies bar gay relationships by students or employees. Trinity Western officials said that they are entitled to hold their religious views, and also to start a law school.

 

Debates about coeducation at Wilson and Salem Colleges

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Wilson will become coeducational. Salem considers whether to let a transgendered student stay after becoming a man -- and sparks fears that it will change its mission.

Judge blocks Deep Springs College from admitting women

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Judge grants injunction to alumni who say that the founder wanted college to educate men only. Case raises anew how institutions balance founders' intentions and the way society has evolved.

Study of British university students points to issue of bias in academic hiring

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Study of British students points to potential for bias in academic hiring.

Gallaudet Reinstates Diversity Official

Gallaudet University has reinstated Angela McCaskill, the institution's chief diversity officer, who was suspended for signing a petition against the recognition of gay marriage by Maryland, the Associated Press reported. The university announced the reinstatement, but did not elaborate or respond to requests for comment. Some advocates for gay rights applauded the suspension, saying that universities cannot promote equity for gay students and employees while having their diversity efforts led by people who believe that gay people should be denied rights available to straight people. But critics said that the university was inappropriately punishing McCaskill for expressing political views.

 

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