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Essay calls for a reform of the teaching of introductory economics

The teaching of introductory economics at the college level remains substantively unchanged from the college classroom of the 1950s, more than 60 years ago. The teaching of other introductory courses, from psychology to biology, has changed dramatically -- with new knowledge and, more importantly, new pedagogical techniques. Today's students are also very different, not accustomed to sitting through 50-minute lectures, taking detailed notes of material and techniques, the value of which has yet to be demonstrated to them.

Thus, it is little wonder that more students do not elect introductory economics or, following the course, do not take more economics. Grades tend to be lower in introductory economics, discouraging many students from taking additional courses. The concern is paramount. In today’s complicated world, the design of sound policy requires an understanding of economic principles. Yet, so many who are deciding on policy, particularly voters, as it is they who elect policymakers in democracies, are frequently ignorant of economic principles. Now many students do major in economics, but frequently for what is perceived to be enhanced employment practices in the business world. Love of the study of economics does not seem to be manifested by many students. If a school has an undergraduate business major, the number of economics majors fall precipitously. Fewer and fewer graduates of liberal arts colleges go on into economics Ph.D. programs that are increasingly populated by very able international students.

Also, our traditionally underrepresented groups are truly underrepresented as students of economics. Women, though more than a majority of today’s college students, still shy from economics, as shown by a recent study done by Professor Claudia Goldin of Harvard University. African Americans and Latinos also are not well-represented in college economics classrooms. Why? Different hypotheses, each of which probably has some significance, include a particular alienation from the teaching methods, lack of role models in the classroom, difficult material and low grades combined with the additional challenge of being a minority student or a first-generation student. Also, normative issues such as poverty and discrimination are frequently marginalized, reducing the relevance of the course to many students.

Recently I chaired a meeting that had faculty members from over 60 undergraduate economics programs to discuss both Advanced Placement economics and the future of the college introductory course. There was consensus that the course seemed to be structured and taught, consistent with the first edition of Paul Samuelson’s famous and dominating textbook, Economics: An Introductory Analysis in 1948 (to continue toward 20 editions!). Texts and the course seem to mirror the major theoretical components of basic microeconomics and macroeconomics. Much has been added (e.g., game theory and rational expectations) with little subtracted (maybe labor unions and Keynesian fixed price case). The result is a rather encyclopedic textbook with 30 or more chapters.

Faculty race through as much of this material as is possible. With such breadth of material, depth is frequently sacrificed. Students are more frequently memorizing and not as frequently learning. Grades tend to be among the lowest in introductory college courses and student satisfaction highly variable. Most distressingly, students are not necessarily learning to think like economists and understand the power of economics as an explanatory tool for human behavior.

Thus, there is momentum to address the deficiencies of this extraordinarily important introductory course. More faculty are aware of these problems and recognize some lack of student enthusiasm. The College Board has initiated the discussion that I mentioned with groups conveyed to look at both introductory microeconomics and introductory macroeconomics. Under the guidance of respected economist John Siegfried (of Vanderbilt University) and a blue-ribbon committee of university economists, the National Council for Economic Education has developed 20 standards for economic understanding and literacy, applicable to differing levels of education. Textbook companies are now offering customized books so that a faculty member need not present 30-plus chapters to a student, but rather can customize 10 or 20 that will form the basis of a streamlined course, one in which students can truly learn economic concepts.

With such positive momentum, will the worthy objective of a newly inspired and improved economics courses become a reality any time soon? Obstacles still exist. Tradition and lethargy can be powerful brakes on new methods and ideas. Also, a course with less breadth means the elimination of some topics. Which will they be? For some economics faculty, labor markets can be eliminated; for others, labor markets form the heart of both microeconomics, and certainly macroeconomics. Yet the payoff is potentially so high.

From my perspective, students who take introductory economics should complete the course with some understanding of 1) why income inequality exists and how to address it, 2) the means by which negative externalities like pollution should be addressed, 3) international economic exchanges can be mutually beneficial, 4) what were causes of our most recent Great Recession, 5) how to address long-term unemployment, and 6) the causes of global inequality. Such a course would be of greater interest to our students in 2014.

In a world full of excruciatingly complex and dangerous problems (from income inequality to environmental degradation), economics, as a discipline, must be a central player as orderly resolution is sought. As mentioned, students might actually study in an economics course the causes and consequence of the Great Economic Recession of 2008. Today, such a topic is often too esoteric and not part of the mainstream cannon of economics. A generation of students, from varying backgrounds and experiences, should be taught to appreciate and even admire the power and the logic of economic analysis. Parents, students, and voters, you all must help to ensure that this opportunity for important educational analysis is not lost.

Clark G. Ross is Johnston Professor of Economics and dean of faculty emeritus at Davidson College.

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Essay calls for the end to job interviews at academic conferences

The arguments in favor of the time-honored ritual don't apply in an era of tight job markets and tight budgets for job-seekers, writes Patrick Iber.

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Essay on finding your alt-ac career without losing your mind

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Image Caption: 
The author visiting the home of collector John Davidson

MLA members back resolution on Israel, but not by margin to make statement official policy

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While majority of members who voted backed measure, it didn't receive the required minimum to set official policy.

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An article in the journal Current Biology argues that it isn't a mystery which science Ph.D.s will land academic jobs. The paper argues that academic positions are determined by just a few factors: the number of publications, the "impact factor" of the journals in which those papers are published, and the number of papers that receive more citations than would be expected for the journals in which the work appears.

 

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SEIU Claims Victory in Seattle U. Adjunct Union Vote

Adjuncts at Seattle University at odds with the administrative over their bid to form a union announced victory Wednesday. The claim was largely symbolic, since the ballots from their recent vote have been impounded by the National Labor Relations Board, pending the university’s appeal of the bid on the grounds that the institution is Roman Catholic and therefore outside NLRB jurisdiction. In a news release, adjunct professor Louisa Edgerly asked the university to drop its appeal, “respect the democratic process, and allow the votes to be counted.” The said adjuncts are “very confident” they won the vote to organize in affiliation with the Service Employees International Union, which is organizing adjuncts in metro areas across the country. In the Seattle area, Pacific Lutheran University adjuncts also have had their votes impounded, pending the university’s appeal of an adjunct union bid, also on religious grounds. A Seattle University spokeswoman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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Academic Minute: Gravity's Constant

In today’s Academic Minute, Jeremy Mould, professor of astrophysics and supercomputers at the Swinburne Institute of Technology, observes that gravity has remained unchanged for
billions of years. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

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U. Nebraska changes role of faculty and students in high-level searches

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Should faculty members have less influence in searches for system administrators than they do at the campus level? The University of Nebraska's Board of Regents thinks so.

Essay on what it's like to be a spousal hire in a faculty job

The author never thought much about her career being connected to her partner's until it was -- and she writes about the numerous challenges of the situation.

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Charleston Southern Disputes Reports on Fired Professor

Charleston Southern University has been facing widespread criticism online for firing a professor for, he says, allowing his image to be used on a beer can for a fund-raiser, apparently offending the anti-alcohol stance of some at the Baptist university. On Tuesday, the university issued a statement criticizing the coverage of the dismissal of Paul Roof, whose former students and others say he was among the best faculty members at the university, The Post and Courier reported. Most articles have suggested that it was the image of a professor on a beer can that caused the problem, not that Roof was fired either for drinking or having a beard (he is known for his beard). The Charleston Southern statement doesn't say why Roof was fired, but says that "it should be clear that the matter involving Dr. Roof is, in no way, premised upon the actual consumption of alcohol. Second, the matter has nothing to do with the presence of facial hair. Thirdly, charitable activities among faculty and staff are encouraged by the university."

Roof responded on his Facebook page, saying: "You are old school friends, colleagues, students, business owners, church members, beard community friends, and much more from all across the city, the state and the country. Community is about helping each other in times of need. You have been here for me and I will be there for you."

 

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