faculty

Lawmaker calls for Central Connecticut State U to fire professor with criminal history

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Amid calls for his termination, Central Connecticut State suspends professor who's had skirmishes with the law -- even though none of the crimes and alleged crimes relate to teaching or publications. When professors break the law, what should a college do?

Essay explains new hashtag campaign to draw attention to the diversity of professors and their appearance

OneLogin’s recent recruitment campaign showing diverse engineers on billboards in the San Francisco Bay Area inspired a viral hashtag: #ILookLikeAnEngineer.

Frustrated by the microaggressions we experience as “nontraditional” faculty, we started a new hashtag: #ILookLikeAProfessor. The flurry of photos, retweets and horror stories since last Thursday suggests that we are not alone in experiencing entrenched stereotypes and bias -- both subtle and explicit.

  • The female professor mistaken for an undergraduate. She was grading homework, not doing it.
  • Male teaching assistants assumed to be the professor.
  • Faculty members of color assumed to be the custodian.
  • Asian professors assumed to be Chinese food delivery drivers.

We are not making this up.

These are real posts from real people -- real professors in diverse fields across the United States -- who do not fit the stereotype of a 60-something, white male professor, usually in tie and tweed. Extra credit if glasses and a beard came to mind.

With the start of the new academic year just around the corner, it’s worth remembering how much the professoriate has changed over the past half century. The civil rights movement, feminism, gay rights, the Americans With Disabilities Act and more transformed many aspects of society, including the academy. It’s time for our assumptions about faculty to catch up with reality.

So, who are we?

We are economists and art historians, musicians and engineers, chemists and sociologists, poets and mathematicians.

We are black, brown and white -- and every shade in between.

We come in all shapes, sizes and proportions.

We are feminine, masculine and androgynous -- and sometimes we look different one day to the next.

We are queer, straight and questioning.

We speak many languages, and some of us have accents.

We have voices high and low, loud and soft.

We wear suits and jeans, hiking boots and high heels.

We have dreads and dyed hair -- and yes, some of us do have beards.

We wear glasses and contacts, ties and scarves, kipot and hijabs.

We have earrings, tattoos and piercings -- only some of which you can see.

We are partnered and single, parents and child-free, caregivers and neighbors.

We are Christian and atheist, Muslim and Jewish, Hindu and Buddhist, pagan and agnostic.

We are athletes and bookworms, hikers and artists, musicians and chefs, gardeners and dog walkers.

In other words, we look just like you.

We look like professors because we are professors. It’s long past time that we ditch the stereotype.

Sara B. Pritchard (@SaraBPritchard) is associate professor of science and technology studies at Cornell University and a Public Voices Fellow at the Op-Ed Project.

Adeline Koh (@adelinekoh) is a director of a digital humanities center at Stockton University and associate professor of literature there.

Michelle Moravec (@professmoravec) is associate professor of history at Rosemont College.

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Coke Funds Scientists Who Shift Obesity Debate

Coca-Cola is funding and providing support to a new group, the Global Energy Balance Network, that supports researchers who say that the best approach to obesity is exercise, without a focus on diet, The New York Times reported. Many scientists question this view and have been unaware of Coke's involvement with the group, which comes at a time when Coke sales (excluding diet drinks) have fallen and many experts are trying to discourage consumption of sugary soft drinks. Coke is not only supporting the new organization, but providing grants to support the work of two of the group's founding members, for their work at the University of South Carolina and West Virginia University. A statement from Coke said: “We partner with some of the foremost experts in the fields of nutrition and physical activity. It’s important to us that the researchers we work with share their own views and scientific findings, regardless of the outcome, and are transparent and open about our funding.”

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Judge rejects move by U of Illinois to dismiss Salaita lawsuit

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Federal judge, in victory for Steven Salaita, refuses to dismiss lawsuit charging U. of Illinois with violating his free speech and contract rights.

Say It Ain't So, Indiana Jones

Did archaeologists from the University of Missouri at Columbia steal dozens of artifacts from a national forest? The Associated Press reported that R. Lee Lyman, professor and chair of archaeology at Missouri, was charged with second-degree theft, second-degree malicious mischief and making false or misleading statements to a public servant regarding an investigation into missing artifacts from Washington State. Matthew T. Boulanger, a research specialist, also has reportedly been charged. The men allegedly took some 93 artifacts -- including arrowheads and other byproducts of toolmaking -- without permission from the Umatilla National Forest and Wenaha-Tucannon Wilderness in southeastern Washington during a 2013 research trip. The artifacts, taken from seven different sites, were protected by the federal Archaeological Resources Protection Act.

Dave N. Schmitt, a researcher affiliated with Southern Methodist University, also faces charges and has pleaded not guilty. He told the Columbia Daily Tribune that the charges are “a thorn in our side and completely unfounded.” Lyman and Boulanger were arraigned in July but did not enter a plea. Lyman did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Boulanger said he had no comment "regarding pending legal action."

The investigation report cites an article the men wrote about the research trip. It says that no excavation was done but some artifacts were collected because they were visible and could be removed by passersby, according to the Associated Press. A university spokesman said the university was aware of the charges but couldn’t comment further.

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Judge Blocks Law School From Terminating Tenured Professor

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The Charleston School of Law says it can't afford to pay a tenured professor. But a judge is blocking her termination as her lawsuit works its way through the courts.

Journal article speculates that Crick and Watson would have difficulty today publishing findings on DNA

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Article speculates that their landmark work on DNA, if evaluated by today's standards, might not have found a journal.

Duquesne U adjuncts object to possible threat not to rehire those involved in union drive

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Duquesne U. adjuncts are angry over what they see as a thinly-veiled threat not to rehire those colleagues involved in a long-running union drive.

Microbiologists show it's possible to achieve gender equity in scholarly presentations

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American Society for Microbiology shows that a scientific group with relatively few female speakers can change things dramatically in just a few years.

review of Dora Apel, "Beautiful Terrible Ruins: Detroit and the Anxiety of Decline"

In 2011, Paul Clemens, a writer from Detroit published an up-close and personal look at deindustrialization called Punching Out: One Year in a Closing Auto Plant. It recorded the year he spent on a work team hired to dismantle and gut one of the city’s remaining factories. I wrote about the book when it came out, and won’t recycle anything here, but recall a few paragraphs expressing a particular kind of frustration that a non-Detroiter can only sympathize with, not really share.

The cause was a tendency by outsiders – or a subset of them at any rate – to treat the city’s decline as perverse kind of tourist attraction or raw material for pontification. Clemens had lost all patience with arty photographs of abandoned buildings and pundits’ blatherscate about the “creative destruction” intrinsic to dynamic capitalism. He also complained about the other side of the coin, the spirit of “we’re turning the corner!” boosterism. “No Parisian is as impatient with American mispronunciation,” he wrote, “no New Yorker as disdainful of tourists needing directions, as is a born-and-bred Detroiter with the optimism of recent arrivals and their various schemes for the city’s improvement.”

Dora Apel, a professor of art history and visual culture at Wayne State University, has, in effect, gathered everything that dismays and offends Clemens between the covers of Beautiful Terrible Ruins: Detroit and the Anxiety of Decline (Rutgers University Press).

She calls Detroit “the quintessential urban nightmare in a world where the majority of people live in cities.” But nightmare imagery can be seductive, making Detroit “a thriving destination for artists, urban explorers, academics, and other curious travelers and researchers who want to experience for themselves industrial, civic, and residential abandonment on a massive scale.”

That lure is felt most keenly by people who, after the “experience,” enjoy the luxury of going home to someplace stable, orderly, and altogether more pleasant. It’s evident Apel finds something ghoulish about taking pleasure from a scene of disaster, “feeding off the city’s misery while understanding little about its problems, histories, or dreams.” But the aesthetic appeal of ruins – the celebration of old buildings crumbling picturesquely, of columns broken but partly standing, of statuary fractured and eroded by time –- goes back at least to the 18th century, and it can’t be reduced to mere gloating. The author makes a brief but effective survey of “ruin lust,” a taste defined by “the beautiful and melancholic struggle between nature and culture,” as well as the feelings of contrast between ancient and modern life that ruins could evoke in the viewer, in pleasurable ways. She also points out how, in previous eras, this taste often involved feelings of national superiority, as with well-off travelers enjoying the sight of another country’s half-demolished architecture. (At least a tinge of gloating, in that case.)

It’s not difficult to recognize classical elements of the ruins aesthetic as "The Tree" by James D. Griffioen. One of a number of images reproduced in the book, Griffioen took the photograph in the Detroit Public Schools Book Depository, in which a sapling has taken root in the mulch created by a layer of decomposing textbooks – an almost schematic case of “the beautiful and melancholic struggle between nature and culture.” But Apel underscores the differences between the 21st century mode of “ruination” and the taste cultivated in earlier periods. For one thing, ““modernist architecture refuses the return of culture to nature in the manner of ancient ruins in large part because the building materials of concrete, steel, and glass do not delicately crumble in the picturesque way that stone does.”

More importantly, though, the fragments aren’t poking up from some barely imaginable gulf in time and culture: Detroit was, in effect, the world capital of industrial society within living memory. In his autobiography published in the early 1990s, then-Mayor Coleman Young wrote: “In the evolutionary urban order, Detroit today has always been your town tomorrow.” The implications of that thought are considerably more gloomy than they were even 20 years ago. One implication of imagery such as "The Tree" is that it’s not a reminder of the recent past so much as a glimpse at the ruins of the not too distant future.

Photography is not the only cultural register in which the fascination with contemporary ruins makes itself evident: There are “urban exploration,” for example: a subculture consisting (it seems) mainly of young guys who trespass on ruined property to take in the ambience while also enjoying the dangers and challenges of moving around in collapsing architecture. Apel also writes about artists in Detroit who have colonized depopulated areas both to reclaim them as living space and to incorporate the ruins into their creative work.

The effects are not strictly local: “the borders between art, media, advertising, and popular culture have become increasingly permeable,” Apel writes, “as visual imagery easily ranges across these formats and as people produce their own imagery on websites and social media.” And the aestheticized ruination of Detroit  feeds into a more widespread (even global) “anxiety of decline” expressed in post-apocalyptic videogame scenarios, survivalist television programs, zombie movies, and so on. Not that Detroit is the inspiration in each case, but it provides the most concrete, real-world example of  dystopia.

“As the largest deteriorating former urban manufacturing center,” Apel writes, contemporary Detroit is a product of  an understanding of society in “rights are dependent on what people can offer to the state’s economic well-being, rather than vice-versa,” and  “the lost protection of the state means vastly inadequate living conditions and the most menial and unprotected forms of labor in cities that are divested of many of their social services and left to their own devices.”

Much of the imagery analyzed in Beautiful Terrible Ruins seems to play right along with that social vision. The nicely composed photographs of crumbling buildings are usually empty of any human presence, while horror movies fill their urban landscapes with the hungry undead -- the shape of dreaded things to come.

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