faculty

Princeton professor who was criticized for using N-word in class on hate speech cancels course

Princeton professor who was criticized for using the word in a class on hate speech cancels the course.

Michigan liberal arts colleges use Google to share courses, transform classrooms

Three liberal arts colleges in Michigan team with the company to share courses via interactive whiteboards and videoconferencing. The results could be transformative, participants say.

How Ph.D. students can find jobs outside academe appropriate to their discipline (opinion)

Skills and knowledge gained from relevant work experience -- and not credentials -- are what will open doors and create opportunities for graduate degree holders, write Jennifer Polk and L. Maren Wood.

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How institutions help faculty members embrace possibilities of innovation

Faculty members need one-on-one consultation, positive reinforcement and examples from early adopters before they'll commit en masse to transforming their classrooms.

Advice to professors for talking about charged issues with students in their classes (opinion)

Teaching Today

Simply presenting the facts is generally not effective in changing minds on a charged issue, writes Gleb Tsipursky.

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Questions About Sabbatical Denials at Utah Valley

Professors at Utah Valley University are asking the institution for more transparency about how it assesses sabbatical applications in the wake of enrollment growth. In an open letter to administrators, 60 professors say that five of eight sabbatical applications from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences were rejected in January on the grounds that only one sabbatical could be granted per department due to resource constraints and enrollment increases. One of those decisions was later reversed, but the professors say that based on such a model, each faculty member in a large department could expect to go on sabbatical every 45 years, while one in a smaller department could take a sabbatical every five years.

Scott Trotter, university spokesperson, told the Daily Herald that faculty comments and concerns “are being considered carefully and we will reach out to our faculty members to address them directly.” Utah Valley’s sabbatical policy says that tenured professors who have been teaching for six years may take leave every six years if their applications are approved, “subject to availability of funds and suitable instructional replacements.” But professors say sabbatical applications have historically been assessed by their research merit and that changing how the policy is applied now pits research against teaching, to the university’s detriment.

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Northwestern Professor Accused of Harassment Takes Leave

A professor of journalism at Northwestern University whom 10 alumnae and employees accused of misconduct is taking a leave of absence, the Chicago Tribune reported. Alec Klein, the professor, “has requested a leave of absence from all of his positions at Northwestern until the university completes its investigation, and the university has agreed that is the appropriate action,” Alan Cubbage, university spokesperson, said in a statement.

Last week, a group of former students and employees of the Justice Project at Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism published an open letter accusing Klein of sexual harassment, abusive behavior and bullying. Klein has denied the claims, saying in a statement that many came from a “disgruntled former employee.” Northwestern has said that some allegations dating back several years were previously found by the university to be unsubstantiated. But new allegations included the letter are now being investigated.

Klein’s attorney, Andrew T. Miltenberg, said in a separate statement that Klein denies the allegations but “intends to respect the confidentiality and privacy” of Northwestern’s investigation. Records obtained by the Tribune show that Northwestern's human resources department recently reviewed complaints made about Klein's behavior and did not determine the allegations to be substantial enough to launch a formal investigation into Klein. Northwestern’s Office of Equal Opportunity and Access said that it would pursue “informal action,” however, such as “a warning to cease current behaviors, no-contact directives, and/or an educational conversation with the respondent or others.”

Meribah Knight, a Nashville Public Radio reporter who graduated from Medill in 2009 and who is one of Klein’s public accusers, said she and her colleagues have received more than two dozen emails from others voicing similar complaints against Klein since last week. “I’m really glad that people felt that they could come forward, but it was sad to see so many of the same patterns emerging,” she told the Tribune.

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How to deal with your career in the midst of upheavals in life (opinion)

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Leah Colvin provides advice for the times when upheavals in life change everything you thought you knew about your work self.

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Teaching evaluations are often used to confirm the worst stereotypes about women faculty (opinion)

Such evaluations pretend to be the result of a neutral process but are better measures of student stereotypes than teaching effectiveness, argues Victor Ray.

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Diversity Newsletter publication date: 
Tuesday, February 13, 2018
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Is Gender Bias an Intended Feature of Teaching Evaluations?

Professor Denied Australia Is a Country

A student in an online sociology course at Southern New Hampshire University had to appeal repeatedly when her professor gave her a failing grade on a key assignment. The problem, BuzzFeed reported, was that the assignment was to compare a social norm in the United States with another country. The student selected Australia as the comparison country, and the instructor rejected the assignment, saying that Australia was a continent, not a country. It took multiple appeals before the instructor relented.

A spokeswoman for Southern New Hampshire University confirmed the facts of the article to Inside Higher Ed. "Yes, it’s true. We take this concern seriously and our academic team is working to resolve the matter," the spokeswoman said.

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