faculty

Rowan University will allow women athletes to practice in sports bras

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University ends rule for female athletes after article draws widespread criticism of the ban.

Mary Baldwin U closes art exhibit after two days when students said they found the art racist

Mary Baldwin shut down an art exhibit after two days when some students said images were racist. But artists say their work was about -- but decidedly not supporting -- the glorification of the Confederacy.

U of Louisville Foundation sues professor it partnered with to a launch a personalized medicine lab

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In what critics say is another bad decision for the U of Louisville Foundation, it's suing a professor it partnered with to launch a failed personalized medicine lab.

Professor Suspended for Giving Nazi Salute

Charles Meyrick, an assistant professor of business and economics at Housatonic Community College, is reportedly on leave after giving a Nazi salute during a recent meeting of faculty members and administrators from the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities. Some at the meeting said that Meyrick appeared agitated -- possibly about a plan to consolidate the system into a single college -- and held his salute for five or 10 minutes, according to the Hartford Courant. Meyrick reportedly put his hand down after campus police arrived.

A college system spokesperson told the Courant that Meyrick is on paid leave pending an investigation into the incident. “The reports of a faculty member’s outburst at a meeting last week, including the use of a Nazi salute, which required campus police to respond are appalling and unacceptable,” Mark Ojakian, system president, said in a statement Friday. Meyrick did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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Georgetown Grad Assistants Form Union

Graduate assistants at Georgetown University voted 555 to 108 to form a union affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers, the university and the union announced in a joint statement Friday. Approximately 1,100 students were eligible to vote. The American Arbitration Association conducted the election, as part of an agreement between Georgetown and the union to hold an election outside of National Labor Relations Board channels. Graduate students at other institutions have asked for similar election agreements in recent years, since the future of a major 2016 NLRB decision in favor of graduate student unions on private campuses is uncertain under a Trump-era board.

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Northern Michigan U Settles Discrimination Suit

Northern Michigan University reached a settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice after four students accused the university of discrimination, the Detroit News reported.

In 2013, a student told another student that she had been diagnosed with major depressive disorder and that her doctors were concerned that she was at risk for suicide. She filed a complaint when the university threatened to “dis-enroll” her and required her to undergo psychological examination and sign an agreement that prohibited her from discussing suicidal thoughts with other students.

The Justice Department found three other students with similar complaints. The settlement will require that the university pay $173,500 in damages to the four students and create a new antidiscrimination act/nondiscrimination policy. Derek Hall, chief marketing officer for the university, told the Detroit News that a new policy is already underway.

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2 Students Arrested, Officer Assaulted at Lincoln U

Two students were arrested after a fight broke out at Lincoln University on Friday, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported. A campus police officer was assaulted while trying to break up the fight, which occurred while students were waiting in line for a late-night dance. The officer used pepper spray to control the crowd and 15 students were sent to the hospital for treatment. All have been released.

The university has canceled all parties and "has pledged to bring students and administrators together to address concerns and develop procedures to prevent such incidents in the future," according to a statement in the Inquirer.

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Tips on how to play a more active role in your discipline (opinion)

Myron Strong provides tips on how academics can take more active roles in their disciplines.

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Northwestern's Law School Will Cut Faculty

Northwestern University's Pritzker School of Law, one of the United States' top-tier law schools, recently announced a wave of faculty cuts in light of a budget shortfall.

Rachel Bertsche, director of strategic communications for the law school, declined to say exactly how many faculty will be cut or how much the shortfall is, but she noted that “employees impacted have been informed their contracts will end at the end of the academic year.” Tenured faculty positions will not be affected.

Law schools across the country have faced enrollment declines and budget constraints since the 2008 recession, and the upcoming cuts at Pritzker indicate that the elite law schools are not immune to such issues.

“As stated in the July 19 letter from Northwestern University senior leadership, the university is seeking efficiencies to address a budgetary shortfall and has called on academic and administrative units to help. Each unit at the university will be approaching the process differently, tailoring approaches to their local realities while trying to be flexible and dynamic in how they respond," Bertsche wrote in an email. "The university is seeking to minimize the impact on essential services and core academic and research activities."

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Students Refuse to Cease and Desist Using Bear Image

The University of California, Los Angeles, asked a student Palestinian-rights group to remove UCLA's name and references to the university's Bruin Bear mascot from its promotional materials. The students are pushing back.

A logo for Students for Justice in Palestine's upcoming conference depicts a bear with a Palestinian kite, which, the university claimed in its cease-and-desist letter, "some may interpret as an intention to endorse violence." The university also requested that the group remove any mention of UCLA except to state where the conference will be held.

"Taken as a whole, these uses claim, suggest, or imply an affiliation with or an endorsement by UCLA of [National Students for Justice in Palestine] and/or its annual conference which is simply incorrect," the letter read.

The students, in conjunction with the ACLU of Southern California and Palestine Legal, issued a statement in response.

“We condemn attempts by UCLA administration to taint imagery that is grounded in freedom and liberation. Moreover, we reject UCLA’s attempt to infringe on our right to associate a bear (which is not trademarked) and a kite -- a children's toy -- with justice for the Palestinian people,” the statement read in part. “The stated demands are ridiculous, and we will continue to use both design elements.”

The ACLU of Southern California and Palestine Legal sent an additional letter to university officials and requested a response from them by Nov. 9 that confirms they will not take legal action against the students.

Tod Tamberg, a university spokesman, said that the students had complied with the university's request to remove "UCLA" from the conference logo.

"Some members of the Jewish community have been sharply critical of upcoming conference, demanding that UCLA move to cancel it. As a public university, UCLA is legally bound to comply with the First Amendment, which protects everyone’s right to express their views, even those that are offensive and hateful or that the university opposes," Tamberg wrote in an email. "Use of campus facilities by a registered student organization to host an event neither constitutes nor implies UCLA’s endorsement of the event, the speakers or the views expressed."

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