faculty

Q&A: Strategies for better assessments in online learning

Online learning offers instructors an opportunity to rethink their approach to assessment. A new book hopes to spur that conversation.

Trial and Error: Building a modern Spanish learning platform

Two foreign-language instructors teamed up to work with a publisher on a digital textbook, but the idea didn't fully blossom until much later.

Advice about grad school from a Ph.D. holder looking back a decade later (opinion)

Looking back a decade later, Vanessa R. Corcoran offers some tips.

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Many faculty support OER but broader adoption remains elusive, white paper finds

Open educational resources have grown a lot in the past decade, but many faculty members remain skeptical of the benefits of OER or confused about implementation.

Flipped learning literature review offers comprehensive view of emerging modality

Interest in active learning is growing, though many remain uncertain of its value and efficacy. A new literature review offers a look at existing research around active learning classrooms and points to possible avenues for additional inquiry.

New online enrollment data from state reciprocity agreement

The National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (NC-SARA) has released an annual report on institutional enrollment data, including breakdowns of enrollments of in-state and out-of-state online students.

Georgia State and publishers continue legal battle over fair use of course materials

Appeals court ruling continues decade-long legal battle between Georgia State University and three publishers over what constitutes "fair use" of course materials. Does anyone still care about the outcome?

Survey: Professors as Mentors to Undergraduates

Professors are most likely to serve as mentors to undergraduate students, according to the results of a new survey, which found that 64 percent of recent graduates who reported having a mentor during college said their mentor was a professor. The next most common category was a college staff member.

The results are from the fourth annual version of the Strada-Gallup Alumni Survey, an iteration of the Gallup-Purdue Index that was rolled out in 2014. The nationally representative survey adds measures of life and job fulfillment to traditional metrics for assessing the value of a college education, such as job-placement rates and alumni salaries. (Gallup conducts some surveys for Inside Higher Ed, but this publication played no role in this survey.)

In this latest version, the survey found that recent graduates who were first-generation college students or members of minority groups were substantially less likely to identify a professor as their mentor.

"Prior research has suggested that mentees seek mentors with similar experiences and backgrounds, and that minority students often seek mentors of the same race/ethnicity and find information more helpful when their mentor is of the same race/ethnicity," the report said. "Unfortunately, minorities remain underrepresented in higher education."

Just 30 percent of respondents said the career advice they received from their college career services office was helpful or very helpful, the survey found, while 49 percent said the same of advice they received from faculty or staff members.

The survey also probed recent graduates about the academic challenge of college. Graduates who strongly agreed that they were challenged academically were 2.4 times more likely to say their education was worth the cost and 3.6 times more likely to say they were prepared for life outside of college.

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The benefits of asking students what should go on the syllabus (opinion)

Teaching Today

When it comes to what should go on a syllabus, the toughest questions are often best answered by students, argues David Ebenbach.

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Election turmoil could put dent in University of Illinois's massive research bid

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An ambitious research effort spanning much of Illinois has its eyes set on Chicago as a new "hub" that could bring together the state's largest public and private universities.

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