faculty

Turnitin faces new questions about efficacy of plagiarism detection software

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Tests conducted by a writing coordinator at the U of Texas at Austin suggest that many student plagiarists could avoid being caught by Turnitin.

Compilation of Articles on Faculty Salaries

Inside Higher Ed is pleased to release today "Faculty Salaries," our latest print-on-demand compilation of articles. The booklet features articles about trends, debates and strategies -- of individuals and of institutions. This compilation is free and you may download a copy here. And you may sign up here for a free webinar on Thursday, August 20, at 2 p.m. Eastern about the themes of the booklet.

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Essay on how new Ph.D.s can ace informal interviews

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There may not be an opening, but there is opportunity, and you always need a strategy, writes Stephanie K. Eberle.

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New Criticism of 'Science' on Gender and Career Advice

Last month, the journal Science received heavy criticism over an advice piece widely called sexist for encouraging a female scientist not to take seriously an adviser's pattern of looking at her chest, not her face, when they talked. The journal ended up pulling the column.

Now Science is being criticized for running another piece that some find sexist. This piece is mostly about getting noticed to advance one's career, and the importance of hard work. The portion of the piece drawing criticism says: "I worked 16 to 17 hours a day, not just to make progress on the technology but also to publish our results in high-impact journals. How did I manage it? My wife -- also a Ph.D. scientist -- worked far less than I did; she took on the bulk of the domestic responsibilities."

Critics say that Science should not be giving advice based on having a (female) spouse focus on child rearing, or on working 16 to 17 hours a day, which essentially removes one parent from child-care duties. Typical tweets: "Hey, @ScienceCareers, we don’t need advice on how to be successful scientists in the 1980s" and "What fresh sexist hell is this? Oh, it's @ScienceCareers. Again."

Editors at the careers section of Science did not respond to email requests for comment. The author of the piece, Eleftherios P. Diamandis, head of clinical biochemistry at a hospital of the University of Toronto, said via email that he had seen the criticisms. "It is a free world; all opinions respected," he wrote. He added, "If I stayed home, would my wife be sexist?"

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Arizona State demotes history professor after investigation into his book

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Arizona State demotes history professor, accused of plagiarism in 2011 and 2014, based on investigation into the latter charges.

Report criticizes how psychology association worked with the Pentagon, post-9/11

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As independent report faults American Psychological Association for failing to uphold its own ethical standards, a look back at how the tensions have played out in academe.

Essay on how to support scholars under attack

Eric Anthony Grollman offers suggestions on how to offer support.

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College drops agreement to add trigger warning to syllabus based on one family's protest

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College backs away from mandatory notice on syllabus of graphic novel course that offended one student and her parents.

Essay on what an associate professor wishes she had known when starting on the tenure track

Kirstie Ramsey reflects on what would have been good knowledge when she was starting on the tenure track.

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Indigenous Female Scholars Issue Open Letter

Twelve Native American women who are scholars of Native American studies have issued an open letter on Andrea Smith, a professor at the University of California at Riverside who is widely viewed as having falsely claimed for years to be Cherokee. (She is not current responding to questions about the matter). The letter, published in Indian Country Today, says that the discussions about Smith have caused a range of reactions, and that many worry about damage the field.

"Our concerns are about the profound need for transparency and responsibility in light of the traumatic histories of colonization, slavery and genocide that shape the present," says the letter. "Andrea Smith has a decades-long history of self-contradictory stories of identity and affiliation testified to by numerous scholars and activists, including her admission to four separate parties that she has no claim to Cherokee ancestry at all. She purportedly promised to no longer identify as Cherokee, and yet in her subsequent appearances and publications she continues to assert herself as a nonspecific 'Native woman' or a 'woman of color' scholar to antiracist activist communities in ways that we believe have destructive intellectual and political consequences. Presenting herself as generically indigenous, and allowing others to represent her as Cherokee, Andrea Smith allows herself to stand in as the representative of collectivities to which she has demonstrated no accountability, and undermines the integrity and vibrancy of Cherokee cultural and political survival."

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