faculty

Academics Win MacArthur 'Genius' Fellowships

Faculty members are among the fortunate winners of this year's “genius” fellowships from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The no-strings fellowships are awarded to “individuals who show exceptional creativity in their work and the prospect for still more in the future.” The winners receive $625,000 over five years, and people cannot apply for the fellowship -- the foundation simply makes its selections.

This year's winners from academe are:

  • Patrick Awuah, founder and president of Ashesi University College, in Ghana.
  • Kartik Chandran, associate professor of earth and environmental engineering at Columbia University.
  • Matthew Desmond, associate professor of sociology and social studies at Harvard University.
  • William Dichtel, associate professor of chemistry at Cornell University.
  • LaToya Ruby Frazier, assistant professor of photography at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.
  • Ben Lerner, professor of English at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York.
  • Dimitri Nakassis, associate professor of classics at the University of Toronto.
  • John Novembre, associate professor of human genetics at the University of Chicago.
  • Christopher Ré, assistant professor of computer science at Stanford University.
  • Marina Rustow, professor of Near Eastern studies and history at Princeton University.
  • Beth Stevens, assistant professor of neurology at Harvard University Medical School.
  • Heidi Williams, assistant professor of economics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • Peidong Yang, S. K. and Angela Chan Distinguished Professor of Energy at the University of California at Berkeley.
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Essay on trauma associated with graduate school

Eric Anthony Grollman on the graduate school experience.

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Drury U Cuts 12 Faculty Members' Jobs

Drury University, in Missouri, is eliminating the jobs of 12 faculty members, none of them with tenure but some on the tenure track, The Springfield News-Leader reported. The university cited an enrollment decline this year, and said that it was eliminating positions in departments with reduced student demand. The faculty members who lost jobs were in theater, philosophy, music, education and languages. The university said that it plans to grow in fields with more student demand, and as a result is adding programs in film and TV production, digital design, animation, and professional writing. The choices of topics for growth, and the fields of those having jobs eliminated, have prompted some on campus to create a Facebook page called "Save Drury as a Liberal Arts School."

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Study explores job satisfaction of full-time, non-tenure-track instructors

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Survey suggests that adjuncts who work at one institution full time have job satisfaction levels close to those on the tenure track.

Essay on a year's worth of advice from an Inside Higher Ed blog on careers

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Joseph Barber reviews 12 months' worth of career advice.

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U of Southern California starts program to train recent Ph.D.s as teachers

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The University of Southern California starts a program to train recent Ph.D. recipients to be better teachers and maybe get a leg up in the job market.

Cornell Grad Students Form Unrecognized Union

Graduate student workers at Cornell University voted to form a union affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers, they announced Thursday. The election took place outside National Labor Relations Board channels and the university has not recognized Cornell Graduate Students United. There’s a federal labor law precedent against graduate student worker unions at private colleges -- Cornell is private, although it operates some units of the State University of New York -- but the union says it would like to be recognized by the university anyway, outside of litigation. (New York University recognized its United Autoworkers-affiliated graduate student union, for example.) If that doesn't happen, the Cornell union says, it will explore various options to further student workers’ goals, which include increased stipends, workers’ compensation, six- and seventh-year funding, and more say in university affairs.

Joel M. Malina, a Cornell spokesperson, said in a statement that graduate student workers are not considered employees under federal labor law since “their relationship with the university is primarily educational. As a result, they do not have the right to union representation or to engage in collective bargaining. Cornell will follow the law.” If the law changes, he said, and graduate student workers still want a union, “such considerations are ultimately a matter for Cornell graduate assistants to decide through the appropriate process, which may include a legally sanctioned election should a sufficient number of graduate students request one.”

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A scholar says academics shouldn't apologize for the popular entertainment they personally enjoy

I am a junior scholar with a secret: I enjoy Masterpiece Theatre’s British period drama Downton Abbey. Actually, “enjoy” is quite the understatement. And this is a very, very difficult thing for me to admit publicly.

You see, I do not watch much television. In fact, I do not even have a television. Like a “good” academic, I eschewed television watching quite some time ago and gleefully admit to this fact in certain circles -- as though a refusal to engage with popular culture by way of television watching is the academic’s badge of honor. If I watch anything at all, I stream it from my laptop as I deal with the mundane activities known to infiltrate daily life (e.g., washing dishes, chopping vegetables, folding laundry and so forth).

But I am practically addicted to Downton Abbey and can engage anyone in conversation about the brilliant characterization dreamed up and brought to life by its creator, Julian Fellowes. (Even Highclere Castle, the series’ setting, is a character in and of itself.) If I am so inclined, I can even be caught invoking a favorite line or two, as it suits my purposes (such as when the sassy cook, Mrs. Patmore, playfully suggests to the rigidly traditional butler, Mr. Carson, that if enjoying a candlelit dinner with his peers is “too democratically overpowering,” he is certainly free to explore other, less desirable options). In short, this series has left me actively refraining from counting the days until the sixth and final season airs in the States in January.

But why bring all this up?

As an academic, I find myself apologizing, or overexplaining, to other scholars my interest in this show should the topic arise. Clearly, the vast majority of the characters are white, and as such, it is not difficult to see my race represented, episode after episode. In fact, with few exceptions, race and racial diversity could not be further from the themes that carry through each season. The series mainly centers on class. Classist hierarchies, however fictionalized for ratings, dominate the narrative -- a detail consistent with the period in which the drama takes place. In conversations, I find myself explaining that I am quite “well aware of the racial and classist problematics,” as a way of introducing, framing and apologizing for my love of the show.

I am also what some might classify as a critical scholar. Indeed, critical race theory and critical whiteness studies are fields that have informed my dissertation, my research agenda, my scholarship, my work with preservice teachers and, frankly, my way of being in the world. A critical pedagogy in education is something for which I am a staunch advocate, and my life’s work involves teaching preservice teachers to deconstruct texts of all kinds for their racialized and oftentimes classist hidden curricula.

My musings about race in education have received mainstream attention, and I like to think that I am becoming more skillful at deconstructing my own positionality as a white scholar with significant unearned privilege, both socially and institutionally. I like to think that, year after year, article after article, conversation after conversation, I am becoming a bit more adept at what Professor Kevin Hylton of Great Britain’s Leeds Beckett University described in an article about critical race theory in Race, Ethnicity and Education (2012) as walking the walk, or “agitat[ing] for change and … [a willingness] to defend positions that are marginal, challenging and sometimes plain unpopular.”

Yet, in truth, my professional and scholarly life is often at odds with what sometimes occurs when I leave the classroom or the conference or put away whatever data I happen to be working with. And I find it utterly mystifying as to why an academic (or anyone, really) would have to defend the perfectly innocuous ways by which he or she experiences enjoyment.

The person’s defense often begins with three or four caveats explaining how he or she “absolutely knows how problematic [insert television show, movie, book, genre of music here] is,” and how “sorry” he or she is to have to admit this, but boy, does he or she enjoy [insert television show, movie, book, genre of music here]. It’s as though the only acceptable engagement with “less critical” forms of popular entertainment are those about which the problematic components are publicly acknowledged, or better yet, explicitly tied to critical research and teaching agendas -- as though we are not entitled to personal lives and downtime free from scholarly theories and deconstructive practices.

In truth, I find the entire dance utterly exhausting. I am acquainted with critical colleagues who enjoy rap and country music, graphic novels and reality television. I can quote, practically verbatim, the apologies and explanations that precede these admissions, as though enjoying, for example, Eminem’s music (however problematic, depending on whom you ask) somehow undermines one’s entire research agenda, academic accomplishments and larger professional goals. As though engaging certain texts for the sheer enjoyment of it is a dirty little secret, acceptable only in the context of acknowledged “problematic themes,” critical theories and apologies. My dear, dear colleagues, do trust: this is an exhausting way to be.

And so it is here that I will publicly vow to not be an exhausting academic when it comes to my colleagues’ interests. I look forward to hearing of your passions and hobbies -- perhaps they will become my own. Indeed, this is some of the stuff I live for. I relish in a catchy tune, a fun book or a television series that has inspired my own learning and inquiry into an era or topic about which I was only superficially knowledgeable before, however fictionalized for ratings.

And here is another dirty little secret for you: I read a romance novel recently and just loved it -- as in a bawling-into-my-blankets kind of love. And I assure you, my professional identity has not imploded, my years of teaching experience have not vanished into thin air and my Ph.D. has not burst into flames upon consumption.

Christina Berchini is an assistant professor in English and education studies at the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire.

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Masterpiece Theatre's Downton Abbey

Essay on how women in academe can avoid being pulled in too many directions

Frantic? Stressed? Overwhelmed? Rena Seltzer recommends five ways that women in academe can avoid being pulled in too many directions.

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Iowa Faculty Group Censures Incoming President

The Faculty Assembly of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Iowa on Wednesday voted to censure J. Bruce Harreld, the incoming president who was selected by the Iowa Board of Regents over the objections of faculty groups. While other faculty bodies have condemned the Board of Regents, this is the first faculty vote censuring Harreld. The vote was over discrepancies in his résumé that his supporters have dismissed as minor issues.

The resolution states: "Whereas the University of Iowa holds all members of the campus community to the highest ethical standards; whereas it is our academic duty to teach and model the highest ethical standards to our students; whereas professional ethics and responsibility in any field require accurate and honest self-presentation on a résumé; whereas incoming President Harreld’s résumé inaccurately claimed the position of managing principal of a company, Executing Strategy, LLC Avon, Colorado, that does not exist; whereas Incoming President Harreld’s résumé fails to cite co-authors for nine of 12 items listed as his publications (as prohibited in University of Iowa Operations Manual Section II.27.10.e Violation 1); the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Faculty Assembly censures incoming President Harreld for his failure of professional ethics."

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