faculty

AAUP session centers on intellectual property and academic freedom in the online education age

Smart Title: 

Cary Nelson warns that MOOCs could lead to erosion of faculty members' intellectual property rights.

Bad Timing for Report on Humanities and Social Sciences

Next week, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences is scheduled to release a report -- requested by members of Congress -- on the state of the humanities and social sciences. But as The New York Times noted, the timing is anything but favorable. In the last week, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences has seen numerous articles in The Boston Globe and elsewhere noting that the academy had applied for grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities stating that Leslie Berlowitz, the head of the academy, has a doctorate. She does not. The academy is investigating the reports just as it is gearing up for the report's release. Berlowitz was one of the key figures in preparing the report.

Ad keywords: 

Peer Review ... of Academic Misconduct?

A new Romanian-based website aims to crack down on research misconduct worldwide -- by encouraging scholars to submit work that they think might be flawed and soliciting other academics to review the work, Times Higher Education reported. The site, integru.org, describes itself as an "international collaborative effort working to uphold academic integrity and ethical values," leaning on the expertise of scholars in various fields because there is no international authority to judge academic misconduct.

Ad keywords: 

Academic Minute: Philosophy of Children’s Books

In today’s Academic Minute, Thomas Wartenberg of Mount Holyoke College reveals the philosophical thought that exists in children’s picture books. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Ad keywords: 

Faculty Athletics Rep Wants U. of Richmond Out of Division I

The faculty athletics representative at the University of Richmond has circulated an e-mail to colleagues calling for the institution to leave Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and to stop playing intercollegiate football, The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported. "I have come to the conclusion that it’s hard-to-impossible to consistently make DI-level sports conform and submit to the primary institutional focus on academics, because there’s just too much money and ambition involved," said  the e-mail from Rick Mayes, an associate professor of political science. Noting concerns about the impact of concussions on football players, he asked whether it would not be better -- for the sake of athletes and to prevent future lawsuits -- to drop football. University administrators indicated that Richmond has no intention of taking the advice Mayes offered.

Ad keywords: 

Multidisciplinary teaching pushes professors outside their comfort zones (essay)

Professors -- especially senior ones -- should challenge themselves by teaching in multidisciplinary programs that force them outside their intellectual comfort zones, writes Michael Nelson.

Ad keywords: 
Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 

Academic Minute: Music of Tin Pan Alley

In today’s Academic Minute, Daniel Goldmark of Case Western Reserve University revisits the music of Tin Pan Alley and explains why buying music by the song isn’t a new idea. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Ad keywords: 

Former American U. professor charges institution with age discrimination and lack of commitment to professional track

Smart Title: 

American U. says it has track for those with non-academic careers who want to join the faculty. A suit charges that the university only values traditional academic credentials.

Responding to Sexist Letter From Harvard Prof in 1961

Phyllis Richman has had a successful career in journalism, and she recently came across a letter she received from a Harvard University professor in 1961, when she was applying to a graduate program there. "[O]ur experience, even with brilliant students, has been that married women find it difficult to carry out worthwhile careers ...  and hence tend to have some feeling of waste about the time and effort spent in professional education," said the letter. It went on to ask Richman to explain how she could balance career and family goals. She didn't answer at the time. But in The Washington Post, she now has done so -- and women of her generation and many of younger generations are praising the response.

 

 

Ad keywords: 

Higher Ed Bubble Watch

It has become trendy if not clichéd in recent years to declare that higher ed is the next "bubble" in the American economic system will pop. This view has been particularly dominant in business publications. Forbes has run columns about the coming higher ed bubble, or why a higher ed bubble should be coming, numerous times (see here and here and here and here and we could go on). Many of those articles predict that one or more "disruptions" in higher education (online learning for example) will be key to the higher ed bubble popping.

So we were surprised on Sunday to read in Forbes that the bubble might not be traditional higher ed. A column that starts off by bemoaning the high cost of elite private higher education ends up noting that students go to college (and parents pay for them to do so) for a lot of reasons other than just the learning in the classroom. Students get connections and they value "the experience," writes a staffer for the magazine. The piece may not please all professors and college administrators because it suggests that students want a fun experience, not just the personal educational experience. But based on this conclusion, the author writes: "There’s no college-education ‘bubble’ forming simply because teens go to college with an eye on a fun four years, after which they hope the school they attend will open doors for a good job. Online education only offers learning that the markets don’t desire, and because it does, its presumed merits are greatly oversold. There’s your 'bubble.' "

Could this be the start of the bursting of the higher-ed-bubble-story bubble?

 

Ad keywords: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - faculty
Back to Top