faculty

Why the essay is integral to teaching (essay)

Teaching Today

Being an essayist is central to, if not inseparable from, being a teacher, argues Caitlin McGill.

Job Tags: 
Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 
Image Source: 
iStock/skynesher
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

How to use assessment tools to determine the best career for you (essay)

Category: 

Stephanie K. Eberle outlines the misconceptions about assessments in career counseling and advises how to use them most effectively.

Job Tags: 
Ad keywords: 
Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 
Image Source: 
iStock/robuart
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Newsletter Order: 
2
Advice Newsletter publication date: 
Thursday, April 20, 2017
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Coloring book offers academics chance to be creative while poking fun at their lives

Smart Title: 

A coloring book from the University of Chicago Press? Yes, and it pokes fun at academe.

Berkeley Settles With Former Law School Dean

The University of California, Berkeley, agreed to let a former law school dean accused of sexual harassment remain on the faculty on sabbatical through May 2018, the Associated Press reported. Under the agreement, announced Friday, the university will withdraw all disciplinary complaints against Sujit Choudhry and allow him to resign next year with access to more than $100,000 in research and travel funds through that time. The agreement includes a "no admissions" clause, saying that neither Choudhry nor the university's Board of Regents admit to wrongdoing in the case.

Choudhry’s former executive assistant, Tyann Sorrell, who accused him of kissing and hugging her without her consent, said in a statement Saturday that the deal “insults all who suffer harassment at the hands of those with power and privilege.” Choudhry will donate $50,000 to nonprofit organizations of Sorrell's choice under the agreement, and he’ll also pay $50,000 of her legal fees.

Berkeley previously substantiated Sorrell’s allegations and gave Choudhry a 10 percent pay cut, and he resigned as dean and stopped teaching but remained a professor, according to the Associated Press. Sorrell sued the university over the harassment last year. Her attorney, Leslie F. Levy, said Saturday that the new agreement is “just one more example of [the university] refusing to take sexual harassment seriously and once again offering a soft landing even after a finding of harassment.”

Choudhry also sued the university over the case, alleging racial discrimination based on the fact that he is South Asian. He accused the university of opening a second investigation of him for the same conduct after Sorrell filed her lawsuit and reports it had mishandled other cases of sexual misconduct. He has since dropped the suit.

Ad keywords: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

Image of Trump sets off dispute at Stanford

Smart Title: 

Professor says university wouldn’t let her print image of Donald Trump -- from recording where he talked about assaulting women -- for an academic conference on Title IX. Amid growing attention to dispute, university relents.

Students should be taught new kinds of poetry (essay)

Is poetry obsolete?

As an English professor and a poet, I face this question every day. The death of poetry would put me out of a job. Each year, I teach a required seminar called Studies in Poetry, in which I must convince a new group of Boston College sophomores that poetry matters in the English major and in life. Although they’d never say it, many students probably enter the class wishing they did not have to take it. My job is to change their minds.

At Yale University’s English Department, where I earned my Ph.D., poetry is making headlines. Last spring, students petitioned the faculty to scrap Major English Poets, a required yearlong sequence featuring mostly white men. Last fall, faculty members agreed to meet to reconsider every word in the title of the course. And just recently, the faculty voted to revise the major, retaining historical distribution requirements while adding a new course, World Anglophone Literature. Major English Poets is now optional.

The last word in the title (Poets) may well be the least important. The students were not suggesting that a roster of white male novelists would be an improvement. The petition didn’t mention lowercase “poetry” once. Yale English professor Leslie Brisman has stated that the new major requirements were meant to remove poetry from its “privileged position” in the department. Has poetry given up the ghost?

Many professors already behave as though poetry doesn’t exist. Of the 10 texts most frequently assigned in American college classes today, according to the Open Syllabus Project, only one is in verse (Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex, No. 7). Poetry is viewed as something that people made long ago, like hieroglyphs. To find a frequently assigned poem written after 1700, you’ll have to move down to No. 62 (Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”). Those figures refer to syllabi from all departments, but that’s the point. Poetry is something you must occasionally read if you major in English or a foreign language. Otherwise, it’s skippable.

Few publishers are committed to the genre. In college, I interned at one of them, Wesleyan University Press, which publishes about a dozen poetry titles per year, a figure that counts as a cornucopia in the world of poetry.

But publishers are only responding to demand. The National Endowment for the Arts has reported that poetry reading among Americans declined from 12 percent to 7 percent between 2002 and 2012 -- down from 20 percent in 1982, according to an earlier NEA report. In fact, just by virtue of completing Studies in Poetry, my students read more poetry last year than 93 percent of Americans (probably much more, since the NEA survey only asked whether respondents had read one single poem). I’m not sure whether to be proud of this or not.

Rumors of the death of poetry have spawned many laments and defenses. Way back in 1991, poet Dana Gioia was already worried (“Can Poetry Matter?”). Surveying this metagenre in a more recent essay wryly titled “Who Reads Poetry?”, Virginia Jackson arrives at the following diagnosis:

In these cases and in many other early-21st-century instances … there lurks the fear that poetry and poetry reading are nearing extinction … But our idealization of poetry is at least partly why we seem to think we are in danger of losing access to the ideal. Our own abstract idea of the lyric makes it possible for us to imagine that we could liberate reading from it or that we are losing our academic discipline, culture or minds if people aren’t reading it.

In other words, poetry’s naysayers and its defenders both misrepresent it as a monolithic enterprise, synonymous with lyric, its most prominent subgenre. Jackson recommends turning to late-19th-century America, her area of expertise, to rediscover the diversity and cultural power of poetry.

Looking back farther, to the Middle Ages (my area of expertise), we learn that anxiety about the future of poetry is nothing new. In the 14th century, London middle manager Geoffrey Chaucer invented the iambic pentameter. At the end of his first composition in this new verse form, Troilus and Criseyde, Chaucer notes the “great diversity” of the English language and addresses the poem itself, praying “that no one miswrites you/Nor mismeters you through a linguistic defect.”

Chaucer worried that future readers wouldn’t hear the poetry in his poetry. Chaucer wasn’t an English professor or a poet laureate. (These positions didn’t exist yet.) He worked as a bureaucrat and wrote verse in his free time. Even so, he was worried.

His fears turned out to be unfounded. Chaucer is often called the father of English poetry, and his Canterbury Tales, which I teach every year, ranks a respectable No. 26 on American syllabi. Major English Poets always begins with Chaucer.

Fast-forward to the present, and poetry in English is as diverse as ever. Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Broadway hit Hamilton is a poetic tapestry, the strands of which include George Washington’s Farewell Address and an 18th-century-duel-themed update of the Notorious B.I.G.’s “Ten Crack Commandments.” Miranda is a worthy heir to Chaucer, who delighted in weaving together old and new influences.

Meanwhile, Bob Dylan continues his never-ending tour. His caustic and absurdly beautiful lyrics received a full-length analysis in 2003 (Christopher Ricks, Dylan’s Visions of Sin) and garnered Dylan a Nobel Prize in literature -- two signs that the institutionalized boundaries between poetry and music might be dissolving. And Patience Agbabi remixes the Canterbury Tales for the 21st century, creating poetry at once authentically medieval and insistently modern.

Now is the time for English departments to teach new kinds of poetry, and to teach the old kinds in new ways. Students at Yale are right to demand a decolonized curriculum -- though this goal is compatible with studying Chaucer, who was making a political statement when he wrote in English rather than French or Latin. The Yale petition reflects the power of poetry to organize communities of readers and learners. In the context of higher education, this power mostly lies in the hands of professors and other people with a business interest in conserving a highly unrepresentative English literary canon. The petition and the predictable reactionary responses to it (“A Safe Space From Chaucer”) lay bare the power differential and the racial, gender and socioeconomic politics behind it.

Yet it is possible, as shown by the recent curricular changes at Yale, to resist the false dichotomy between literary value and social justice. Students deserve both.

Eric Weiskott is an assistant professor of English at Boston College. He is the author of English Alliterative Verse: Poetic Tradition and Literary History. Follow him on Twitter @ericweiskott.

Editorial Tags: 
Image Source: 
Getty Images
Image Caption: 
Lin-Manuel Miranda in the musical “Hamilton”
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Newsletter Order: 
4
Diversity Newsletter publication date: 
Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Advice to those who work in science disciplines for dealing with sexual violence (essay)

Sexual Assault on Campus

Learning to navigate safe relationships and thinking critically about sexual experiences is a hallmark of the college period, writes Maggie Hardy.

Job Tags: 
Ad keywords: 
Show on Jobs site: 
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Newsletter Order: 
5
Diversity Newsletter publication date: 
Tuesday, April 18, 2017
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

U of Central Florida reprimands art professor over allegedly demeaning comments

Smart Title: 

University of Central Florida reprimands a long-serving professor of art for allegedly demeaning a student.

Advice for putting your dissertation in the proper perspective (essay)

There’s no denying its benefits, but it’s still only a project -- and one you can complete, writes Noelle Sterne.

Job Tags: 
Ad keywords: 
Editorial Tags: 
Show on Jobs site: 
Image Source: 
iStock/arsat
Is this diversity newsletter?: 
Newsletter Order: 
3
Advice Newsletter publication date: 
Thursday, April 20, 2017
Is this Career Advice newsletter?: 

To improve Ph.D. completion rates, Australian universities use metrics on their supervisors

Smart Title: 

The key may be tracking the performance of those who supervise doctoral students.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - faculty
Back to Top