faculty

Proposed UNC policy would keep academic centers from taking part in lawsuits

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UNC board members want law school’s civil rights center to be barred from lawsuits and suing the state -- which the center has done with success in the past.

Higher education should acknowledge that many Americans believe colleges indoctrinate students in liberalism (essay)

At last week’s Conservative Political Action Conference, newly confirmed U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos was sharply critical of the higher education community: “The fight against the education establishment extends to you, too. The faculty, from adjunct professors to deans, tell you what to do, what to say and, more ominously, what to think. They say that if you voted for Donald Trump, you’re a threat to the university community. But the real threat is silencing the First Amendment rights of people with whom you disagree.”

The secretary’s comments, of course, are offensive to most of us in higher education who labor to ensure that our students learn to question assumptions, think critically and creatively, and, above all, think for themselves. But higher education leaders need to do more than dismiss DeVos’s comments. We should acknowledge that many Americans believe the same thing: that higher education is indoctrination in the dogmas of liberalism. I know that my own students question whether it is appropriate for faculty members to advocate for positions they perceive to be political.

It’s time to reframe the discussion. We should ask why this perception exists, whether we have unwittingly contributed to the perception and what we can do to change it.

It is time to clearly articulate the centrality of faculty in challenging our students to think for themselves. When students are tempted to surround themselves with friends and media sources that only support their presuppositions, faculty members need to push them to dig more deeply into issues.

Often it is difficult for students to examine their assumptions. Remember how hard it is when others challenge us to think more critically. We, along with our students, need to understand that critical thinking is not being critical. It entails gathering evidence, questioning assumptions, respecting solid facts, thinking logically, looking at problems from many angles and then building creative solutions. Critical thinking requires us to consider and value the ideas of others, even when we disagree.

And let us savor that moment when our students’ grasp of critical thinking empowers them to disagree with us. We must respect the views of all of our students, whether politically liberal, moderate or conservative. And just as we track and seek to improve the belonging and engagement of students based on race, ability or disability, gender and sexuality, we should pay attention to political and religious conservatives who may feel marginalized.

At the same time, we in the higher education community must resist attempts at intimidation. Now more than ever, it’s time to cherish higher education’s shared values. In these times of division, when there is so much empty and spiteful rhetoric, higher education should unite in rising above adversaries’ words by advocating for inclusion, justice and critical thinking.

I invite DeVos to visit my campus and learn with our students in their classes. She would discover that Augustana, like many campuses, works hard to ensure the voices of all students are heard and valued on campus. She also would see that college students aren’t pliable souls awaiting indoctrination. They tend to be confident -- sometimes too confident.

Our job is to ensure that our students’ gut feelings become informed opinions that they can defend from within a framework of considered values and a system of careful, critical thought. Graduates who are critical thinkers are indispensable to the great institutions of our country, and indeed to democracy itself.

Steven C. Bahls is president of Augustana College in Rock Island, Ill.

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The myriad unofficial demands on faculty members to advise students (essay)

While it’s usually not mentioned in job descriptions or part of any formal training, a major part of the unofficial duties of faculty members involves helping students deal with personal challenges, writes Angela B. Fulk.

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12-Hour Commute to Class With Noam Chomsky

Noam Chomsky (left), the noted linguist and political thinker who teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is this semester co-teaching a course on politics at the University of Arizona. When Joe Coughlin heard about the course, he knew he needed to attend, even though he's not a student, and even though he lives in Bakersfield, Cal. He commutes 12 hours each way -- via bus and train -- to attend the lectures on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Tucson.com reported. The article noted that Coughlin isn't the only nonstudent attending. More than half of the roughly 500 students who attend the lectures are not enrolled. People start lining up at 4 p.m. for the 5 p.m. classes.

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Research confirms that professors lean left, but questions assumptions about what this means for conservatives

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DeVos accusation that faculty members seek to tell students what to think renews debate, on which research is plentiful. Studies say professors lean left but challenge idea that this results in indoctrination or harms conservatives.

Visiting scholar detained and nearly deported

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Texas A&M intervened when French Holocaust scholar headed to a conference was blocked from leaving the airport.

Suspension Lifted for Student Who Taped Instructor

The board of the Coast Community College District has told Orange Coast College to revoke its suspension of a student who set off a debate over student and faculty rights by secretly recording his professor's anti-Trump comments, The Los Angeles Times reported. The student was suspended for violating college rules against unauthorized recordings. The student and his backers said that the real issue was the professor's comments, while her supporters said that her comments had been distorted. The board also said that the professor will not face any disciplinary action, rejecting the student's complaint about her.

A statement said that the board's decision was designed to "bring closure to a chain of events that has led to the distress for many, most especially, an OCC teacher and student."

 

 

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Professor Attacked in Office With Box Cutter

A professor at J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, in Virginia, was attacked in his office Thursday by a woman with a box cutter, The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported. The professor, who has not been named, is being treated in a hospital with injuries that are not life-threatening. The woman has been charged with malicious wounding and is being held without bail in a local jail. The article did not indicate if the woman had a link to the college.

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Juggling both a baby and grad school as a minority student (essay)

Dealing with both pregnancy and a Ph.D. were challenge enough, writes Whitney N. Laster Pirtle, without the unexpected additional burdens that she faced.

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Diversity Newsletter publication date: 
Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Lessons learned as a black Ph.D. student (essay)

Eric Anthony Grollman shares advice and insights for new and prospective students.

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