institutionalfinance

Bipartisan Bill Would Compel Broad Reporting of College Sports Finances

A pair of Congressional lawmakers, one Democrat and one Republican, introduced legislation Monday that would compel colleges (including private institutions), conferences and the National Collegiate Athletic Association itself to provide broad financial data that the federal government would publish, USA Today reported. U.S. Reps. David Price, a North Carolina Democrat, and Thomas Petri, a Wisconsin Republican, said their bill would require colleges to make public the detailed revenue and expenditure data they provide to the NCAA (which many private institutions now refuse to provide), and would require conferences and the new College Football Playoff to similarly make their own financial data available.

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Amid 'Negative Outlook' for Higher Ed, Moody's Finds Optimism

The financial picture for higher education remains negative, but “green shoots” of stability are emerging, according to a new industry outlook by Moody’s Investors Service.

The usual concerns about higher ed still apply: because students and families worry about price and cost, colleges can’t much raise tuition to increase their revenue; state funding will increase, but not enough to keep up with the growth in expenses; competition for sponsored research will continue to be fierce; and demographic forces will exacerbate stress at weaker colleges, among other concerns.

Moody’s still finds reasons for hope. Among them: long-term demand for higher education remains strong, particularly interest in associate and master’s degrees; rebounds in the job and housing market augur well for the higher ed sector; and endowment returns continue to grow.

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Spelman President, Campaign Concluded, to Step Down

Spelman College on Wednesday announced that Beverly Daniel Tatum, president since 2002, will retire in June. The announcement came the same day the college announced that it has completed a 10-year fund-raising campaign that brought in $157.8 million. The campaign has tripled the available scholarships for Spelman students and supported significant enhancements to faculty research and facilities as well. Tatum is well-known as a scholar of race relations among young people, and she has continued to write about and speak about that issue during her presidency. Given Spelman's many roles, Tatum has also been an advocate for historically black colleges, women's colleges and liberal arts colleges. In 2012, Tatum announced that Spelman would eliminate intercollegiate athletics and instead focus on promoting wellness and fitness among its students.

Here is a Q&A interview with Tatum on the numerous racial incidents and tensions on campuses nationwide in fall 2013. And here is an essay she wrote on racial incidents after the 2008 election of President Obama.

 

 

Seeking New Models for Public Urban Universities

Seven public urban universities have been selected to receive $225,000 grants each to support the development and testing of new models for the sector, dealing with issues such as improved student success and cost efficiencies. The institutions are: Florida International University, Fresno State University, Georgia State University, Portland State University, Temple University, University of Akron, and University of Illinois at Chicago. The grants are from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities and the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities, in a program supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

 

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Faculty Rally Against Scripps-USC Merger

Faculty members at the Scripps Research Institute, a free-standing research institution in California and Florida, are organizing to oppose a possible merger with the University of Southern California, The San Diego Union-Tribune reported. The scholars are criticizing both the idea of a merger and what they say was a lack of input in developing the plans, which have not been finalized. Administrators at Scripps did not respond to requests for comment.

 

Christian college, weathering unexpected $1.5 million cash shortage, prays for donations

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One Christian college's supporters are praying and fasting in a bid to raise money to overcome what officials say is a financial crisis caused by employees who withheld vital information about the institution's finances.

Thunderbird May Become Part of Arizona State

The Thunderbird School of Global Management has signed a letter of intent to become a part of Arizona State University, the university announced Thursday. Thunderbird is a freestanding, well-respected private business school, but it has struggled financially in recent years and has been looking to become part of a larger institution. In April, amid criticism from some alumni and objections from its accreditor, Thunderbird and the for-profit higher education company Laureate announced that they were ending talks about an affiliation. Some of the criticism of the proposed deal focused on Laureate's for-profit status.

Thunderbird would remain an independent unit of Arizona State (which has a business school) under the plan being discussed. Current Thunderbird students would be able to finish their current degree programs. The Arizona State statement said changes would also take place at Thunderbird. "As part of the work underway under the letter of intent, Thunderbird and ASU will work to restructure the form that the faculty and staff operations would take as a unit of ASU. Personnel reductions are likely to result, with the goal of making the new Thunderbird school self-sustaining within ASU so that no current or new state appropriations or existing tuition will be required. The nature and scale of the reductions are still being studied," the statement said. When the merger is complete, tuition rates (in-state and out of state) would be set by Arizona Board of Regents rules.

Will Counts, executive director of the Thunderbird Independent Alumni Association, which led opposition to the Laureate plan, issued this statement: "The Thunderbird Independent Alumni Association was surprised at the recent announcement and that the alumni had to first find out about the merger through the media rather than from our alma mater. We have a great deal of respect for ASU, their recent success and wish to remain optimistic. Before we comment on the merits of the ASU-Thunderbird integration we are going to have to see more details about the structure of this transaction. Based on the articles presented thus far, it is even more important to have an independent alumni association going forward."

UCLA's full-time MBA program turns down state funding

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Program turns down state money in hopes of raising tuition and luring more donor support. Other programs are watching. Is this a sign of what's next for the UC system?

Chasing Dollars, More Colleges May Sell Beer at Games

USA Today reports that more universities are reconsidering the bans many of them have had on the sale of beer at sporting events, especially football games. The article says that many programs, particularly in the South, are holding firm on their longstanding opposition to selling alcohol, for philosophical reasons and concerns related to fan safety. But institutions such as Southern Methodist University -- after an experiment with alcohol sales at men's basketball and other games that earned it more than $100,000 in profit -- will sell beer at its games beginning this fall, USA Today said.

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Report Explores Net Price Increases at Mass. Private Colleges

The net price paid by students rose by an average of 10.5 percent from 2008 to 2013 at 33 independent colleges examined by The Boston Globe, faster than inflation, the newspaper reported. The Globe's study found that net price -- the amount paid by students after financial aid was awarded -- rose by at least 15 percent at 11 of the 33 institutions. College officials offered a range of explanations for the increases to the Globe.

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