Fight Escalates Over U. of California Admissions, Budgets

Tensions between the University of California System and state leaders escalated Tuesday, The Sacramento Bee reported. State officials have been pushing the university system to shift some admissions slots from out-of-state applicants to Californians. But in legislative testimony Tuesday, UC President Janet Napolitano said that the university could not increase in-state enrollment at current budget levels. “We will not be admitting students that we don’t know that we actually have funding for,” she said. Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins called Napolitano's statement "UC’s latest attempt to use students as bargaining chips.”


Wyoming Catholic Won't Use Federal Aid or Loans

Wyoming Catholic College announced last week that it will not participate in federal student aid or loan programs. The college, founded in 2005, achieved candidate status for accreditation last year, making it eligible to apply to participate in federal student aid programs. But the college's board voted not to participate, citing concerns about federal regulations that are attached to student aid programs. While many private colleges complain about federal regulations, very few opt out of aid programs. The college said it would step up fund-raising efforts so that it could offer more assistance directly to students. A statement from President Kevin Roberts said: “By abstaining from federal funding programs, we will safeguard our mission from unwarranted federal involvement — an involvement increasingly at odds with our Catholic beliefs, the content of our curriculum, and our institutional practices.”


Western Nevada Eliminates Athletics

Western Nevada College announced Tuesday that it is eliminating its two intercollegiate teams, baseball and softball, The Record Courier reported. Officials said they could not justify the expense -- $400,000 a year for 50 students who played on the teams.


Private Art College May Merge Into Salem State U.

A small free-standing art college in Massachusetts, Montserrat College of Art, may merge into Salem State University, the two institutions announced Monday. The two institutions have been in private due diligence discussions and now plan to move to public discussions involving various campus constituencies. A statement from Stephen D. Immerman, the Montserrat president, said, "Montserrat offers a unique brand of arts education for a unique student population. However, as a small, private college with less than 400 students, it is challenging to provide the resources needed to maintain and grow the competitive advantages needed for working artists. By joining Salem State, we believe that we can ensure that the Montserrat name and the college's tradition of excellence and student-centered education will remain available for future generations of aspiring artists and designers."

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New University System to Focus on Health Careers

A new university system focused on health care -- and financed in an unusual way -- was announced this morning, backed by the German publishing giant Bertelsmann. Arist Education System said it would create a system of graduate and professional health and human sciences institutions. The first institution to join the system is California's Alliant International University, which specializes in psychology, health sciences and law. Like the other institutions as part of Arist, Alliant -- which has been a private nonprofit university -- will become a public benefit corporation, a form of for-profit company that strives to pursue a social mission.

Illinois Governor Seeks Nearly $387M in Higher Ed Cuts

Illinois's new governor, Bruce Rauner, this week proposed a $387 million cut to the state's higher education budget. About $209 million of that will come from the University of Illinois -- that's nearly one-third of the system's state subsidy. 

"A budget cut of that magnitude would substantially harm our students and the people of Illinois by most severely impacting the university’s core education and research missions," Robert Easter, the president of the three-campus system, said in a statement. He promised to vigorously lobby against the cuts. While the governor is a Republican, Democrats have the majority in both chambers of the Illinois General Assembly.

Illinois is one of the few states to see dramatic increases in higher ed spending in the last few years, but none of the money has gone into the classroom -- instead, the state has been ponying up hundreds of millions of dollars to fund a broken pension system.

Middlebury set to abandon plan that tied tuition to inflation to keep down prices

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College received attention and praise for trying to limit tuition increases. Now, the college says the system will no longer work.

Sit-In to Protest Fossil Fuel Investments

Divest Harvard, a student group that wants Harvard University to sell off its investments in fossil fuel companies, started a sit-in Thursday outside the office of President Drew Faust. WBUR reported that Faust agreed to meet with the students if they would agree to leave the building -- and that they rejected the request. On social media Thursday night, the students reported that they were settling in for the night. In 2013, after reviewing the issue, Faust said that divestment was not "warranted or wise."


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Report seeks to add specificity to debate over states' performance-based funding models

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Gates-funded report seeks to define and classify types of performance-based funding in 35 states, drawing tentative praise from researchers who have criticized the policies.

Florida Governor Wants to Freeze Graduate Tuitions

Florida Governor Rick Scott, a Republican, plans to propose that public universities be required to freeze tuition in graduate and professional programs at whatever levels exist on July 1, the Associated Press reported. The measure is of concern to many university leaders who say that increases for medical and law school can be handled by students who have lucrative job prospects ahead.



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