institutionalfinance

UC-Berkeley May Have to Borrow for Stadium Renovation

The University of California at Berkeley sports program has fallen $270 million short of its fund-raising goal for a renovation of its football stadium, and the university may have to borrow -- and pick up the bond payments -- out of general campus funds, The Wall Street Journal reported. While Berkeley administrators say that any such payments are years away, the prospect of another athletics-related drain on the university's budget agitates faculty members, who have bristled in recent years at significant budget deficits in the athletics program.

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U. of California Admits Many More Foreign and Out-of-State Students

The number of foreign and out-of-state students admitted to the University of California's 10 campuses soared by 43 percent this year, while the overall number of would-be freshmen admitted from within the state's borders grew by just 3.6 percent, the university system said Tuesday. The university, like many public institutions, has sought to help offset budget cuts by enrolling more students who pay full tuitions, leading to increases in non-state residents in many places. Out-of-state and foreign students made up nearly one in five students admitted for next fall, 18,846 of a total of 80,289.

Report Finds Mismatched Priorities in Texas

State leaders in Texas have set admirably ambitious goals for its public colleges and universities, but some of those goals are not compatible, and huge inequities persist across the system, according to a new report by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's Institute for Higher Education Research. Texas has also failed to understand the "policy tradeoffs" required to make needed improvements, the report said. For example, the state's push to expand the research capacity of its "emerging" universities is an expensive venture at a time when state financial aid has not kept pace with tuition increases. The report is the fourth of a five-state study from the institute.

Questioning Conventional Wisdom on Tuition Increases

Fitch Ratings, which analyzes some colleges' credit worthiness, on Friday released an analysis challenging the idea that tuition increases are doing damage to many Americans' ability to enroll, and to higher education generally. "[T]he increase in cost of attendance at U.S. colleges and universities, which began during the mid-1990s and accelerated through the end of the past decade, has not yet had a meaningful impact on enrollment at most institutions," the ratings service said. "The lack of a negative enrollment trend, we believe, underscores fundamentally robust societal demand for postsecondary education and the non-discretionary nature of a college degree."

Guilford Students Push for Fee Increase

Students at Guilford College are pushing for a fee increase ($100 over two years) at a time when many college students are objecting to such increases. The News-Record reported that students want the increase to increase the student aid budget. The move comes as Guilford (along with other private colleges in North Carolina) face a loss of state funds for aid for North Carolina students. The college's board will vote on the proposal in June. Kent Chabotar, president of the college, said that he was surprised by the proposal. "The last thing you’d think would be that they’d want to increase the fees even more on their own authority." But he added that push to help fellow students was "a classic Guilford move."

 

Report Analyzes Decline in State Support for Higher Education

State spending on higher education increased by $10.5 billion in absolute terms from 1990 to 2010, but considering changes in enrollments and inflation, funding per public full-time equivalent student dropped by 26.1 percent from 1990-1991 to 2009-2010, according to a report released Monday by the think tank Demos. During the same period, the report documents, tuition at public institution has seen large increases in many states. While many of those states have also increased aid budgets, a large share of those funds has gone to programs that are not based on financial need. The report notes that household income has not generally increased to match the tuition increases, and that the volume of outstanding student debt has grown by a factor of 4.5 since 1999.

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Differential tuition grows in popularity, even at community colleges

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Despite the uproar over Santa Monica, differential tuition has become normal at many public universities and is making inroads in community colleges.

Chancellor Asks Santa Monica to Hold Off on Two-Tiered Tuition

Jack Scott, chancellor of California's community college system, on Wednesday called the president of Santa Monica College to ask him to put on hold a controversial plan to start charging more for some high-demand academic programs, The Los Angeles Times reported. Scott also told the Santa Monica president, Chui L. Tsang, of concerns over the clash campus police had with students during a protest Tuesday, a clash in which pepper spray was used. Scott said he told Tsang that the believed the plan violated state education codes and also could deny access to some low-income students. He also said he was worried about the plan setting a precedent others might follow. Santa Monica officials said that they would consider the chancellor's request. "The president will discuss it with the board to get a sense of where they stand," said a Santa Monica spokesman. "He listened to what the chancellor had to say but was noncommittal. No decision has been made at this point."

Midwestern liberal arts colleges use lacrosse to recapture suburban students

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Division III lacrosse has become a tool for Midwestern liberal arts colleges to recapture suburban students, a group central to their business strategy.

Rhode Island Weighs Bill to Let Cities Levy Taxes on Nonprofits

Providence's mayor urged Rhode Island legislators Thursday to approve legislation that would allow the state's cities to charge colleges and other nonprofit institutions taxes of up to 25 percent of what they would owe if they were taxable entities, The Boston Globe reported. Providence is among numerous cities that have been looking to their tax-exempt institutions to help it fill budget gaps left by state budget cuts and declines in other revenues.


 

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