international

International educators debate higher education priorities for developing countries

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International education experts debate whether developing countries should focus their time and money on colleges and universities that educate the elite or the masses.

Houston Community College encounters challenges in Qatar

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Houston Community College's experiences in Qatar -- including issues of gender segregation, administrative infighting and student discontent -- provide a cautionary tale of foreign expansion.

Admissions reforms unsettle British universities

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Proposed reforms have some universities threatening to withdraw from centralized system.

Commission considers arguments about international recruiting agents

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Admissions leaders -- charged with resolving a major ethics debate -- hear reports on how other countries handle the issue, consider inconsistencies of U.S. policy and ask a lot of tough questions.

Indian recruitment a focus at AIEA conference

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Many American colleges want more students from the country, but those whose efforts are relatively young or small say not to expect an immediate enrollment surge.

North Dakota and New York stories raise questions about ensuring international quality

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Stories about colleges in New York and North Dakota highlight the lack of independent authority overseeing the quality of universities’ efforts abroad.

Debate over Chinese-funded institutes at American universities

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As network of Chinese-funded institutes at American universities expands, some professors see opportunities. Others worry about academic freedom and whether centers promote "culturetainment," not scholarship.

Technion role in New York competition a win for Israeli science

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Technion's partnership with Cornell and the pair's planned New York City campus could signal new era for Israeli universities and more prominence for Israeli science.

Stellenbosch Tries Again on Language Policy

Stellenbosch University on Sunday announced that its governing council had approved new principles for a language policy. Stellenbosch is one of South Africa's leading research universities, but the dominance of Afrikaans language courses at the university is seen as discouraging by many black students and potential students who are fluent in English and see Afrikaans as a relic of apartheid. The university has been going back and forth on how much it will emphasize one language or the other, facing criticism on all sides.

Under the principles announced Sunday:

  • English offerings should be expanded so that no student is excluded from programs because of the lack of English instruction.
  • Afrikaans offerings should not be decreased, and should be "further promoted."
  • "[A] commitment to the development and promotion of isiXhosa as academic language."
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Universities Oppose Proposed Rules on Research Involving International Students

Organizations that represent research universities have been negotiating with federal agencies over proposed regulations that they fear would effectively prevent many international students from participating in studies financed by business. Currently international students generally may work on basic research, but there are more restrictions on classified research. The new regulations would make research subject to proprietary review by corporate sponsors ineligible for the basic research exemption. Such a rule would exclude international students from too many studies, and would not provide essential protections to American interests, the groups argue. The issue has been being discussed for months, and a new version of the rules may be proposed soon. The groups that are representing universities are the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, and the Council on Governmental Relations.

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