international

International educators debate higher education priorities for developing countries

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International education experts debate whether developing countries should focus their time and money on colleges and universities that educate the elite or the masses.

Houston Community College encounters challenges in Qatar

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Houston Community College's experiences in Qatar -- including issues of gender segregation, administrative infighting and student discontent -- provide a cautionary tale of foreign expansion.

Admissions reforms unsettle British universities

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Proposed reforms have some universities threatening to withdraw from centralized system.

Commission considers arguments about international recruiting agents

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Admissions leaders -- charged with resolving a major ethics debate -- hear reports on how other countries handle the issue, consider inconsistencies of U.S. policy and ask a lot of tough questions.

Indian recruitment a focus at AIEA conference

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Many American colleges want more students from the country, but those whose efforts are relatively young or small say not to expect an immediate enrollment surge.

North Dakota and New York stories raise questions about ensuring international quality

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Stories about colleges in New York and North Dakota highlight the lack of independent authority overseeing the quality of universities’ efforts abroad.

Debate over Chinese-funded institutes at American universities

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As network of Chinese-funded institutes at American universities expands, some professors see opportunities. Others worry about academic freedom and whether centers promote "culturetainment," not scholarship.

Technion role in New York competition a win for Israeli science

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Technion's partnership with Cornell and the pair's planned New York City campus could signal new era for Israeli universities and more prominence for Israeli science.

International Educators Group Names New CEO

NAFSA: Association of International Educators on Monday announced as its new executive director and CEO Esther Brimmer, a foreign policy expert and academic.

Brimmer, who formerly worked at the U.S. Department of State, is currently a professor of practice of international affairs at George Washington University, an adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and a senior adviser at the consulting firm McLarty Associates. She will assume her new leadership role at NAFSA on Jan. 1, succeeding Marlene M. Johnson, who is retiring after 18 years at NAFSA’s helm.

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Protests Continue at South African Universities

Some South African universities remain closed amid continuing protests over tuition rates, which have in some cases involved violence.

Among those universities that have closed, the University of Pretoria moved up its upcoming recess period and plans to reopen Oct. 10. In a statement Monday the university said protesters blockaded entrances and disrupted classes. A statement from Pretoria’s vice chancellor and principal, Cheryl de la Rey, also described “incidents of arson and other violent behavior.”

Other universities that have suspended classes or have moved up scheduled breaks include Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Rhodes University, Tshwane University of Technology and the Universities of Cape Town and Witwatersrand.

The latter institution, known as Wits, has suspended all university operations until further notice and plans to poll staff and students on whether to reopen on Monday “if the appropriate security measures are in place.”

"If the majority of students and staff support the reopening on Monday, 3 October 2016, the university will call upon government and the police to meet their obligations to protect the university’s property and to safeguard the lives of students and staff," the university's statement on the matter said.

Three petrol bombs were found on the Wits campus over the weekend. Eyewitness News reported Monday that a cleaning worker died after inhaling fumes from a fire extinguisher allegedly released last week by student protesters in a Wits residence hall. The university said in a statement expressing its sympathies that the worker had been "rushed to the Campus Health and Wellness Centre and then taken to hospital, where the worker was treated for a few days. The worker was discharged from hospital and then passed away."

The university said the cause of death has not been determined.

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