international

International educators debate higher education priorities for developing countries

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International education experts debate whether developing countries should focus their time and money on colleges and universities that educate the elite or the masses.

Houston Community College encounters challenges in Qatar

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Houston Community College's experiences in Qatar -- including issues of gender segregation, administrative infighting and student discontent -- provide a cautionary tale of foreign expansion.

Admissions reforms unsettle British universities

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Proposed reforms have some universities threatening to withdraw from centralized system.

Commission considers arguments about international recruiting agents

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Admissions leaders -- charged with resolving a major ethics debate -- hear reports on how other countries handle the issue, consider inconsistencies of U.S. policy and ask a lot of tough questions.

Indian recruitment a focus at AIEA conference

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Many American colleges want more students from the country, but those whose efforts are relatively young or small say not to expect an immediate enrollment surge.

North Dakota and New York stories raise questions about ensuring international quality

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Stories about colleges in New York and North Dakota highlight the lack of independent authority overseeing the quality of universities’ efforts abroad.

Debate over Chinese-funded institutes at American universities

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As network of Chinese-funded institutes at American universities expands, some professors see opportunities. Others worry about academic freedom and whether centers promote "culturetainment," not scholarship.

Technion role in New York competition a win for Israeli science

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Technion's partnership with Cornell and the pair's planned New York City campus could signal new era for Israeli universities and more prominence for Israeli science.

Chinese Company Accused of Fraud Withdraws From Project to Combat Fraud

A Chinese company that was the subject of a Reuters investigation into application fraud has withdrawn from a multi-university project focused on verification of Chinese student transcripts, the news agency reported.

Reuters in October published an article about the Shanghai-based Dipont Education Management Group detailing allegations by ex-employees that it helped students commit application fraud and described how the company "bought access" to admissions officers from top American universities who participated in the company’s summer admission workshops in exchange for $4,500 honoraria or business-class airfare. The original article further noted that Dipont donated $750,000 to a University of Southern California research center for a multi-university project it was leading to attempt to combat application fraud by creating "verifiable credentials" for Chinese applicants to U.S. colleges.

Reuters reported Wednesday that Dipont has withdrawn from the project. A Dipont vice president, Jeff Zhu, said the project’s advisory board recommended the company withdraw “to eliminate any possible question of who has control over the project.”

The future of the project, which has involved Columbia and Stanford Universities, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Los Angeles, as well as USC, is now unclear. At least two institutions, Pomona and Swarthmore Colleges, have dropped out.

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Finland's universities fear brain drain is following budget cuts

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After major budget cuts for universities, Ph.D.s are leaving the country.

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