international

In the Event of a Homeland Security Shutdown

The Student and Exchange Visitor Program, which certifies universities to host foreign students and scholars and maintains a database that tracks international students’ whereabouts in the United States, will continue to operate in the case of a possible Department of Homeland Security shutdown, though its activities may be hobbled due to reduced manpower in administrative offices. For example, if SEVP were to revoke a university’s certification to host international students, it would need the legal office to sign off on it first. And it relies on the human resources office to process job applications.

“The Student and Exchange Visitor Program is funded by user fees,” a spokeswoman, Carissa Cutrell, said in a statement. “In the event of a government shutdown, or partial government shutdown, SEVP continues to operate, overseeing approximately 1 million international students and 9,000 schools certified to enroll international students, as well as the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System.”

Funding for the Department of Homeland Security is set to expire on Friday, and a new spending bill has so far been stymied in Congress by a dispute over President Obama’s executive actions on immigration. The Department of Homeland Security has said that a shutdown would result in the furloughing of 30,000 workers. However, 75 to 80 percent of the department's employees, including border patrol agents and customs inspectors, are considered essential and will be asked to come to work without a paycheck.

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Northwestern Helps on Creation of Law School in Qatar

Northwestern University is advising Hamad bin Khalifa University on the creation of its new graduate-level law school in Qatar’s Education City. Northwestern will advise HBKU on curriculum development and faculty hiring for the new law school, which plans to award an American-style, three-year J.D. degree.  

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Poll: The British See Academic Careers as Desirable

British people see academic careers as desirable -- and as more desirable than careers that might strike many Americans as more attractive, according to a new poll from YouGov. The poll asked Britons whether they would like to do various jobs, and 51 percent said they would like to be an academic. That was the third most popular job (respondents could pick more than one), after author (60 percent) and librarian (54 percent). Among the jobs with lower rankings: doctor (39 percent), Olympic athlete (31 percent), member of Parliament (31 percent) and Hollywood movie star (31 percent).

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British universities are spending more on agents to recruit international students

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British universities are paying more in commissions to recruit international students.

At international education conference, panelists focus on the impacts of overseas partnerships

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At international education conference, panelists discuss how to develop more meaningful international collaborations.

 

UMass Amherst reverses policy barring admission to Iranian students in certain fields

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UMass, after consulting with State Department, reverses policy that would have prohibited Iranian students from enrolling in certain programs.

At international education conference, speakers ask whether expectations for study abroad are high enough

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At a conference for international education administrators, sessions focus on whether universities are setting high enough expectations for students when they study abroad. 

Report finds U.S. millennial generation faring poorly educationally compared to those of OECD nations

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New international study compares young adults in U.S. with those of other O.E.C.D. nations -- and the results won't cheer Americans.

Peking U. Gets a New, Controversial President

Peking University announced Sunday that it is replacing its president, who has been controversial, with another academic leader who has also been controversial, The South China Morning Post reported. Out is Wang Enge, who has been in the office only two years and who has been criticized for his push for an elite college within the university to educate foreign students. He is being replaced by Lin Jianhua, who has been controversial in two previous presidencies.

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U. of Zurich Criticized for Work Funded by Philip Morris

Antismoking groups and some academics are calling on the University of Zurich to retract two papers it published -- without peer review -- that were financed by Philip Morris International, The Guardian reported. The papers argued that there is no evidence that requiring cigarettes to be sold in plain packages has an impact on tobacco use. Critics are questioning the findings and the nature of the arrangement with Philip Morris, noting that the company had the right to review the material prior to publication. The researchers defend their work and say that it is being described inaccurately.

 

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