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Brandeis Suspends Partnership With Palestinian University Over Campus Protest

Brandeis University on Monday suspended its partnership with Al-Quds University, citing the failure of leaders at the Palestinian university to condemn a recent protest in which demonstrators used the traditional Nazi salute and honored "martyred" suicide bombers. In a statement on its website, Brandeis said that President Frederick Lawrence had acted after asking the president of Al-Quds to issue an "unequivocal condemnation" of the protests. But the statement published on the Al-Quds website -- an English translation of which the president of Al-Quds, Sari Nusseibah, sent to Brandeis -- criticized "Jewish extremists" who "spare no effort to exploit some rare but nonetheless damaging events or scenes which occur on the campus of Al Quds University," as well as calling for a respectful campus environment. Brandeis called the statement "unacceptable and inflammatory," and said it would suspend the relationship with Al-Quds.

 

 

 

 

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Protests Over Job Cuts at Russian University

Russian officials have pledged to investigate why there have been major layoffs at Moscow State University, RIA Novosti reported. The government has been pushing the university to raise employee salaries, but has not provided funds for the increased pay.

 

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Indonesia seeks higher education strategy to fill its needs gap

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Indonesia seeks a higher education strategy to fill its skills gap, add Ph.D.s and provide more instruction in English.

New GRE data illustrate trends on future graduate students

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New data from ETS illustrate gaps by race and nationality in GRE scores, and differences between graduate population of Americans and non-Americans.

Needy Students' Access to Elite Colleges Limited -- and Not Just in U.S.

Children with professional parents are about three times likelier than those with working-class parents to be admitted to the most selective universities in England and Australia as well as the United States, according to a study reported by Times Higher Education. The study, produced in conjunction with a conference sponsored by the Sutton Trust, a British philanthropy focused on educational access for those with low-income backgrounds, concludes that while a significant portion of the gap in access can be explained by differences in educational preparation, about a quarter of it cannot.

 

Indiana Wesleyan plans to acquire a Christian higher education institution in Australia

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Indiana Wesleyan U. plans to acquire the Wesley Institute, in Sydney, with hopes to create the first full-fledged Protestant university in Australia and New Zealand.

U.S.AID official outlines priorities for agency's engagement with higher education

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At a gathering of leaders of public and land-grant universities, a U.S. development official describes future priorities for the agency's engagement with higher education. 

Academics Rally Around Fired U. of Zurich Scholar

Hundreds of academics have urged the University of Zurich to restore the job of Iris Ritzmann, a professor at the university's Institute for the History of Medicine, SwissInfo reported. She was fired for confidential documents to reporters that deal with criticism of Christoph Mörgeli, the head of the university’s Medical History Museum, who is also a politician. Statements by Ritzmann's supporters say that she has defended academic standards, and was punished for political reasons. The rector, Andreas Fischer, has resigned amid the controversy, saying he took "ultimate responsibility" for what has happened.

 

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Rankers announce new evaluations for universities in emerging economies and the Middle East

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U.S. News -- with money from Qatar Foundation -- looks to evaluate universities in the Middle East while two British rankers plan to compare universities in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa.

Next Steps for the Wellesley-Peking Partnership

Wellesley College President H. Kim Bottomly issued a statement Thursday saying she was pleased that faculty voted to continue the college's partnership with Peking University. More than 130 Wellesley faculty had signed a letter earlier this year saying they would urge the college to reconsider its partnership with Peking if it fired an economics professor, Xia Yeliang, “based solely on his political and philosophical views." Xia’s contract was not renewed last month in a decision that many in the West view as retribution for his criticism of the Chinese government, though Peking maintains it was a result of his teaching and research record. 

Bottomly’s statement does not speak directly to the issues raised by the Wellesley faculty letter in regards to academic freedom and conditions for collaboration with universities in authoritarian societies. Rather, the statement speaks more broadly to the faculty role in determining the future direction of the partnership.

“A dedicated group of faculty will develop Wellesley’s recommendations for the parameters and elements of the partnership,” she said. “These recommendations will be brought to the full faculty body at Wellesley for approval and will then be shared with faculty counterparts at Peking University for their consideration.”

Susan M. Reverby, a professor of women’s and gender studies at Wellesley who was one of the leaders of the letter-writing campaign, wrote that she believed the letter-writers did in fact achieve a great deal.  She said that the faculty action, among other things, “raised the question of what these partnership qua exchanges are about,” “reminded our colleagues they should not give up their control over the educational experience (writ large) of our students and that more transparency in the process is absolutely required,” and “made it clear that academic freedom and human rights matter even when we engage with countries whose political cultures are different from ours (and even when many of us disagree with what our own country does too).”

“Furthermore,” she wrote, “we have hopefully made it more difficult for Professor Xia to be persecuted, even jailed, at home and found a way to bring him here (something we did not expect to happen when we first began this process of questioning the partnership).”

In a previous statement President Bottomly indicated she is supportive of efforts to bring Xia to Wellesley as a visiting scholar, but Thursday’s statement did not speak to that subject. A college spokeswoman said that nothing has been finalized yet in this regard.

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