international

Community College Signs Transfer Pact With British University

Raritan Valley Community College, in New Jersey, has signed an articulation agreement enabling graduates to transfer to the London-based University of Greenwich, The Messenger-Gazette reported. James B. Ventantonio, the college's interim president, described it as the first of a number of articulation agreements Raritan Valley hopes to forge with foreign universities. 

Student Account of Sex Harassment Abroad Strikes Chord

A University of Chicago student’s essay about her experience of sexual harassment while studying abroad in India had attracted about 350,000 page views by Tuesday morning, CNN reported. Many Indian readers sympathized with the story – some men offered their personal apologies -- but others warned against making generalizations about India or Indians.

The student, a South Asian studies major named Michaela Cross, said she was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and is on a leave of absence from Chicago. (A spokesman for the university contacted by CNN confirmed that Cross is a student there but did not confirm details of her leave.) In the essay, posted under a pseudonym, Cross described spending three months “in a traveler's heaven and a woman's hell. I was stalked, groped, masturbated at; and yet I had adventures beyond my imagination. I hoped that my nightmare would end at the tarmac, but that was just the beginning."

In a statement provided to CNN, the University of Chicago said it was committed to caring for students' safety and providing support to students before, during and after the study abroad experience. "We also place extremely high value on the knowledge our students seek by traveling and studying other civilizations and cultures, and we are committed to ensuring they can do so in safety while enriching their intellectual lives."

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Canadian Profs Detained in Egypt

Two Canadian professors have been detained in Egypt for reasons that remain unclear, the CBC reported. John Greyson, an associate professor of film at York University, and Tarek Loubani, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Western Ontario, were arrested Friday in Cairo and taken to Tora Prison. They were planning to travel to Gaza, where Greyson was to explore the possibility of making a documentary and Loubani was involved in a program to train local doctors.

“Canada has been working at the highest levels to request confirmation of the nature of the charges and call for all evidence against the two Canadians [to] be released," the junior foreign affairs minister, Lynne Yelich, said in a statement on Monday. “I cannot say much about this case due to the privacy and security concerns of the two men involved. However, we strongly believe that this is a case of two people being in the wrong place at the wrong time."

About 1,000 people have been killed in clashes between the police and supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi since violence erupted in Egypt last Wednesday. 

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What International Students Pay - Around the World

A new study by HSBC compares what international students pay, in U.S. dollar equivalents, at the largest institutions in various countries. Using this method, Australia is the most expensive, with an average cost (including living expenses) of $38,516. The U.S. is the second most expensive, at $35,705, followed by Britain at $30,325. Of the countries examined, Germany was the least expensive, at $6,285.

 

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Prof Dismissed for Alleged Public Sex With Student

A tenured art professor at the University of Georgia has been terminated for allegedly having sex in a public place with a student on a study abroad program he was leading in Costa Rica, the Augusta Chronicle reported. A faculty panel had split on the appropriate sanctions for James Barsness, with two recommending revocation of tenure and three arguing for less serious sanctions, citing Barsness's strong record of teaching and research, undisclosed medical issues, and his evident remorse. But former UGA President Michael Adams overrode the panel's recommendation, writing in a May 13 letter to Barsness that “Upon review I have determined that public sex with a student under one’s direction and control in a UGA program merits termination. It is my judgment that the charges were sustained and that your employment relationship with UGA, including tenure, should be terminated as of this date.” The Board of Regents upheld Adams’s judgment at its meeting on Wednesday. Barsness could not immediately be reached for comment.

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Thai University Abandons Use of Anti-Cheating Hats

Kasetsart University has abandoned the use of hats -- in which pieces of paper attached to the head prevent students' eyes from wandering -- designed to prevent cheating, The Bangkok Post reported. Students designed the hats, but officials said that they abandoned the idea after widespread discussion of them on social media.

 

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British universities consider policies for foreign students who hire translators

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Many British universities lack policies on what kind of help foreign students can receive.

Scholarships for Those Who Join Israel's Online Diplomacy

The Israeli government plans to provide scholarships to students who post pro-Israel messages on social media sites as part of a new online public diplomacy campaign. Haaretz reported that the Prime Minister’s office has joined with the National Union of Israeli Students to create “covert units” at each of Israel’s seven universities, each to be headed by a senior student coordinator who will receive a full scholarship; other students who are involved will receive smaller scholarships. The Prime Minister’s office has allocated about $777,000 for scholarships in the upcoming academic year.

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Convictions of Turkish academics provoke outcry from international scholarly groups

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International scholarly groups raise concerns about the long sentences handed down to six Turkish academics and former university rectors caught up in a massive terrorism-related trial widely condemned as unjust.

Med Schools in Eastern Europe Attract Foreign Students

Medical schools in Eastern Europe are seeing increases in the number of foreign students enrolling, particularly in programs taught in English, The New York Times reported. The programs are less expensive than those in the United States and are easier to get into.

 

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