In Move to Mainland China, U. of Macau to Have Uncensored Internet

The University of Macau is relocating to a much larger campus in Zhuhai, where it will be the first academic institution in mainland China to have officially negotiated an uncensored Internet connection, The New York Times reported. Despite its mainland location, the campus will be governed by the laws of Macau – a semi-autonomous region of China (like Hong Kong). Students who commute from Macau to the campus will do so through an underwater tunnel and without undergoing the usual immigration checks. Concrete barriers will separate the campus from the rest of China.

An associate professor of law at the University of Macau quoted in the article described the situation as “curious”: “This piece of land is not legally an enlargement of Macau, but in practice, it is,” Jorge A.F. Godinho told the newspaper. “There won’t be a border or Internet censorship or anything.”

Ad keywords: 

Concerns on Job Prospects for New Israeli Ph.D.s

Israeli science and education officials are concerned about a new government study finding that only about one-third of those who earn Ph.D.s at Israeli universities eventually join the faculties of those institutions, The Jerusalem Post reported. Officials said that they believed the one-third figure reflected a brain drain problem, which they said should be remedied by providing more funds to Israeli universities and private research institutions to hire more Ph.D.s. Another data point of concern found that while 77 percent of new male Ph.D.s do their postdoctoral training abroad (most commonly in the United States), only half of new female Ph.D.s do so. Postdoc location is important because the best jobs in Israeli academe go to those with foreign postdoctoral training.


Ad keywords: 

Student Who Was Blinded by Husband Finishes Master's

Rumana Monzur, a student at the University of British Columbia who was blinded by her husband on a trip back home to Bangladesh, has finished her master's degree, The Canadian Press reported. It took Monzur two years to recover and to earn the master's degree in British Columbia. She is now planning to go to law school.


Ad keywords: 

Toronto College Found to Have Misled Students

Ontario’s top court has upheld a lower court ruling finding that George Brown College, in Toronto, was negligent in publishing a misleading description of its graduate international business management program, clearing the way for the awarding of damages to students, CBC reported. Almost 120 students, two-thirds of them international, had enrolled in the program, which was billed in a 2007 course calendar as providing students "with the opportunity to complete three industry designations/certifications in addition to the George Brown college graduate certificate." The students were distressed, however, to find that they would not automatically earn industry designations in international trade, customs services and international freight forwarding upon graduating from the program. While the university argued that a “reasonable student” who did his or research could be expected to have known that, Superior Court Justice Edward Belobaba determined that the description "could plausibly be interpreted as meaning exactly what it said."

"Having paid a substantial tuition fee and related travel and living expenses, they could not afford the additional time or money needed to pursue the three accreditations on their own.” 

Ad keywords: 

U. of Chicago Moving MBA Program From Singapore to Hong Kong

The University of Chicago is moving its Asian M.B.A. program from Singapore to Hong Kong, The Wall Street Journal reported. The move reflects the growing demand from people in China for M.B.A. programs, and a desire to be closer to China.


Ad keywords: 

New report shows dependence of U.S. graduate programs on foreign students.

Smart Title: 

New report provides breakdown on international enrollments by discipline and institution, showing that there are graduate STEM programs in which more than 90 percent of students are from outside the U.S.

Chinese Scientist Accused of Stealing Drug Pleads to Lesser Charge

A Chinese scientist accused of stealing three vials of a potential anti-cancer drug compound from the Medical College of Wisconsin has pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of illegally accessing a computer; a charge of economic espionage was dropped, NBC News reported.  Hua Jun Zhao faces up to a $250,000 fine and five years in prison. His sentencing is scheduled for next month.

Ad keywords: 

Study Abroad Positively Impacts Personality, Study Says

Students who spend a semester or year abroad show positive changes in their personality, according to a new study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Researchers at Germany’s Friedrich Schiller University Jena surveyed more than 1,100 students, including 527 who studied abroad and a control group of 607 who did not, on measures associated with the “Big Five” personality traits (agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability, extraversion, and openness). They found significant differences between the two groups even after controlling for higher levels of extraversion, open-mindedness and conscientiousness exhibited by study abroad students before leaving home.

"Those who spent some time abroad profit in their personality development, for instance in terms of growing openness and emotional stability," Julia Zimmermann, the lead author, said in a press release. "Their development regarding these characteristics clearly differed from the control group even when initial personality differences were taken into account."

Ad keywords: 

London Mayor Criticized for Saying Women Go to College for Husbands

London Mayor Boris Johnson is under attack for a quip suggesting that female students are still after Mrs. degrees. Times Higher Education reported that Johnson was on a panel on which Malaysia's prime minister was talking about the increasing number of women enrolling. Johnson said that women "have got to find men to marry." Twitter is full of outrage over the comment. One comment: "Women go to university to bag themselves a husband! Sure, it still being 1953!" Another: "Does this mean I can get a refund on my student loan?! Didn't find a husband at my uni... “

Professor Faces Ouster From Peking U.

Xia Yeliang, an economics professor at Peking University, has confirmed to The South China Morning Post that his department will be voting on whether to expel him. Xia has written and spoken out critically about Chinese government policies. He is currently a visiting professor at Stanford University but plans to return to Beijing to defend his right to speak out and hold a faculty position at Peking University. "This is not coming from Peking University, this is coming from the central leadership," Xia said. "The state of academic freedom is getting worse and worse. Nowadays, you don't have the right to debate anymore. A university is a place that should be free and open."

Ad keywords: 


Subscribe to RSS - international
Back to Top