international

German Education Minister, Stripped of Doctorate, Quits

Annette Schavan resigned as Germany's education minister on Saturday, days after Heinrich Heine University revoked her doctorate, the Associated Press reported. The university found that portions of her dissertation had been plagiarized, a charge that Schavan has denied.

 

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University in Singapore Lifts Ban on Condom Sales

Condoms were removed from a campus drug store at National University of Singapore this week, but amid considerable attention locally, the university said that sales may resume, Bloomberg reported. Many had criticized the decision -- now called a "misunderstanding" by the university -- to have the condoms removed. One student told the news service that the university "is afraid of the implications that selling condoms might have on students living in dorms. If you want to have sex, you’ll get it somewhere else. Taking condoms on and off shelves isn’t the right way to deal with such issues.”

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Australian financier gives $50M for scholarships, challenges his peers

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As Australian universities get into the fund-raising game, an international financier sets the pace with a $50 million donation and encourages others to follow suit.

British universities spend big to prepare for increase in tuition rates

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British universities prepare for an increase in tuition rates.

German Education Minister Stripped of Doctorate

A panel at Heinrich Heine University has decided to strip Germany's education minister, Annette Schavan, of her doctorate because the committee found her dissertation to be plagiarized, the Associated Press reported. Schavan denies the charges and plans to appeal. A former defense minister in Germany resigned in 2011 after revelations that he had copied portions of his doctoral thesis.

 

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Initiative Launched to Provide Higher Ed to Refugees

York University, in Toronto, announced on Monday that it had received more than $4.5 million from the Canadian International Development Agency to lead the Borderless Higher Education for Refugees (BHER) project in Dadaab, Kenya. York is one of four universities -- along with Moi and Kenyatta Universities, in Kenya, and the University of British Columbia -- participating in the initiative, which aims to provide higher education to primary and secondary school teachers in the six refugee camps on the Kenya-Somalia border. The BHER organizers are focusing on education for teachers – who in many cases have completed only primary or secondary school themselves – with the objective of indirectly improving the quality of education for thousands of their students.

Don Dippo, a professor of education at York, explained that the first cohort of 200 teachers/students will be admitted this summer for a foundation year program. Following the foundation year, the participating universities have committed to offer various two-year diploma and three- or four-year degree programs. The programs will be delivered through a hybrid of face-to-face and online instruction.

BHER's organizers expect to enroll 200 new students a year, for a total of 1,000, over the five-year term of the grant.

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Chinese Minority Scholar Blocked From Coming to U.S.

Chinese authorities have blocked Ilham Tohti, a leading scholar from China’s Turkic Uighur ethnic minority, from leaving the country to start a fellowship at Indiana University at Bloomington, the Associated Press reported. Tohti said he was questioned for hours at the airport before being sent home. Tohti has spoken out about the treatment of Chinese minority groups, and been criticized for doing so by Chinese authorities. A spokesman for Indiana told Inside HIgher Ed that Tohti was scheduled to start as a visiting scholar in Central Eurasian studies at the university.

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Criticism of Dress Code for Women at University in Gaza

Officials of the Palestinian Authority, which does not control Gaza, are criticizing Al-Aqsa University, which is located there, for adopting a dress code for female students, Ma'an reported. Women will be required to wear "Islamic" attire, but officials said that need not be a full body or head covering, but must involve modesty. The university says that the vast majority of women on campus already dress appropriately, and that lectures would be used to encourage others to change their attire. Palestinian Authority officials said that the rules conflict with guarantees of personal freedom that are part of Palestinian law.

 

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Danish Universities Complain of Difficulty of Hiring Foreigners

Danish government officials have pledged to make it easier for their universities to recruit foreign talent. But The Copenhagen Post reported that various regulations are actually making it more difficult for them to hire researchers from outside Denmark. Handling the rules and paperwork is so complex that the University of Copenhagen has created an office just to advise foreign scholars on the process.

 

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Proposed Increases in Exchange Visitor Program Fees

The U.S. State Department is proposing to raise two fees related to the Exchange Visitor [J-1 visa] Program. Under the proposed changes, described  in Wednesday’s Federal Register, the fee assessed for sponsor designation or re-designation would increase from $2,700 to $3,982, and the administrative fee charged for changes to a J-1 visa holder’s status (such as extensions or requests for reinstatement) would increase from $233 to $367.

Short-term visiting scholars fall under the Exchange Visitor Program, as do some students who are being supported by sources other than personal or family funds. Public comments on the proposal are being accepted through April 1.

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