international

Oxford Leader: Philanthropy Can't Replace the State

The vice chancellor of the University of Oxford on Tuesday announced a major expansion of the university's fund-raising campaign, but also warned that philanthropy cannot replace state support for higher education. Andrew Hamilton, the vice chancellor, upped the goal for the campaign from £1.25 million to £3 billion (or from $2 billion to $4.8 billion). In a speech praising the role of philanthropy, he also cautioned against assuming that it can pay for all the costs associated with the university. Philanthropy is not, he said, "a magic bullet for the future funding of our universities, and nor is it a door through which the state can progressively leave the scene."

 

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Penn and Turkey's Antiquities Campaign

The announcement last month by the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology that it was making an indefinite loan of 24 artifacts from ancient Troy to Turkey is one of the Turkish victories in the country's controversial campaign to recover antiquities, The New York Times reported. In the deal with Penn, Turkey promised future loans and collaboration on other projects. Many museums in the United States and Europe have faced demands in recent years that they return art taken from Greece, Turkey and other nations under questionable circumstances in eras before current ethical standards for excavations were in place. The Times article noted, however, that some museum directors question Turkey's approach to the issue, Critics have charged that Turkish museums have art taken from lands ruled in the Ottoman period that are now independent nations. "The Turks are engaging in polemics and nasty politics," said Hermann Parzinger, president of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation. "They should be careful about making moral claims when their museums are full of looted treasures."

 

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The Irish University Merger Nobody Wants

An article in The Irish Times explores the reasons why experts periodically propose (as happened last week in a government-requested report) that Trinity College Dublin and University College Dublin be merged, and why just about everyone associated with the two institutions hates the idea. The idea of a merger is that a combined institution would be stronger (especially in international rankings). Historically, religion and class might have divided the two institutions, since Trinity was founded for the Protestant elite under English royal rule, UCD was founded by Roman Catholics to serve those excluded from Trinity. Today such ethnic divides are less evident, although the universities prefer to be rivals who sometimes cooperate than to shed their institutional identities, the article said.

 

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New analysis on factors associated with academics publishing more than others

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Networking and motivation have more of an impact than age, gender or teaching load, according to study of European academics.

$500 Million in Scholarships Pledged for African Students

The MasterCard Foundation on Wednesday pledged $500 million for scholarships for African students over the next 10 years. Many of the students will enroll at institutions that are partners in the program. Among them are the American University of Beirut, Arizona State University, Ashesi University, Duke University, EARTH University, Michigan State University, Stanford University, University of California at Berkeley and Wellesley College. Details on the new program may be found here.

 

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Organizations make $2 million commitment to aid Syrian students and scholars.

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Education and development organizations launch new push to fund overseas fellowships and scholarships for Syrian students and professors.

Professor in Australia Loses Job Over Satirical Poem

An academic at the University of New England, in Australia, has lost his job over a poem he wrote to offer sympathy to a colleague who lost his job, The Australian reported. The poem referred to senior officials in the music program by their instruments, calling them names such as Oboe, Horn and Organ. The university considered the poem a work "calculated to bring senior officers of the university into disrepute." After various letters from lawyers, the poem is no longer online, nor is its author working at the university.

 

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Entry Exam for Israeli Universities Adds Writing Test

The psychometric test used by Israeli universities to admit students has for the first time asked students to write a short composition, Haaretz reported. Educators said that they wanted a writing sample to reflect the role of writing in the university curriculum, and many students who took the test said that they were pleased to have the chance to demonstrate their composition skills.

 

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Dean Resigns Over Concerns About Chinese Students’ Readiness and Support

An associate dean at the University of San Francisco’s School of Management resigned from her post due to concerns about the recruitment of large numbers of Chinese students with low levels of English language proficiency and the effect of this on the overall educational experience, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

The former associate dean for undergraduate studies, Dayle Smith, remains on USF’s management faculty; she did not return messages seeking comment on Monday. The university’s provost, Jennifer E. Turpin, told Inside Higher Ed there was disagreement as to whether advising support for international students should be located within the business school (reporting to Smith) or be centrally administered (reporting to the vice provost of student life). USF has opted for the latter strategy. A new universitywide advising center is up and running.

There are 781 Chinese students at USF this fall, up from 589 one year ago. A total of 143 freshmen were admitted conditionally due to their English language levels. Turpin said that the university has actually strengthened its requirements for regular (as opposed to conditional) international admissions. In addition to requiring a Test of English as a Foreign Language Score of 79, USF has added a new requirement that students must have a score of at least 17 on each of the subsections. Students with TOEFL scores below that cutoff are admitted conditionally, and must enroll in intensive English coursework, she said.

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Study tracks European tracking of university students

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Universities and governments on the continent exhibit many of the same data limitations as U.S. colleges in gauging student outcomes, study shows.

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