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Digital accessibility experts discuss how they approach the faculty role

How do campus officials responsible for the creation of digital instructional materials balance accessibility requirements with faculty independence and academic freedom? We asked a group of them.

After UC Berkeley announcement, universities say they will continue to offer free educational content

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Institutions say they will not follow in Berkeley’s footsteps and delete publicly available educational content.

Technology allows teaching in two places at once

Rutgers University is employing a technology that allows instructors to teach simultaneously at two campuses, reducing student commute times and classroom sizes.

Director of SUNY's online program imagines tuition-free education

Open SUNY, the online hub for the state's higher-education system, could flourish under the governor's proposed tuition-free plan.  

Smaller institutions report increase in personalized phishing attempts

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Smaller institutions report an increase in sophisticated attempts to gain access to financial and personal information.

New America releases guidelines on ethical use of data

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New America releases framework to help colleges use predictive analytics to benefit students.

Canadian College Is Victim of 'Cyberterrorism' Attack

A Canadian university has become the victim of an ongoing cyberterrorism attack, CBC News reported.

As of Friday, the University of Moncton had received nine “degrading and unwanted” emails from an unknown sender, according to the university’s president and vice chancellor, Raymond Théberge. The emails were sent out campuswide and reached about 2,000 students and staff.

The emails, which began arriving a little over a week ago, target a single female student in what some university officials are calling “revenge porn.” The emails include sexually explicit images.

Officials don’t believe university data or personal information have been compromised at any point, and their IT department is working to intercept new emails from the sender.

Some students at the University of Moncton asked that the campus email system be cut off until the perpetrator was found and held accountable. But Théberge said that would affect the institution’s nearly 4,000 students and would give the cyberattacker what he or she wants.

“If we were to freeze all emails, it will mean the perpetrator will have succeeded in stopping us from operating,” Théberge said. “This is a type of cyberterrorism, and it’s never a good thing to give in to these kinds of attacks.”

Police believe they have uncovered the identity of the culprit, but they have not yet found the person. One of the two servers they are following is connected with an IP address in Europe.

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How two Simmons College online programs became a multimillion-dollar venture

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At Simmons College, two online degree programs launched less than five years ago are about to become the greatest source of tuition revenue on the campus.

Ohio college invests in tech to enhance learning

The initiative, set to launch in fall 2017, will provide students and faculty and staff members with Apple devices to enhance their work in and out of the classroom -- while also trying to make sure people are sometimes off the grid.

Students Fall Prey to Employment Scam

College students across the country are taking the bait on an employment scam that gives scammers access to their bank accounts, according to an announcement from the FBI.

The scammers send out emails and post advertisements for job openings, typically recruiting students to take on administrative positions. During the hiring process, students are told they need to purchase certain equipment or supplies for the new job, and the “employer” will send a counterfeit check to reimburse them for the materials. After the student deposits the check, they are asked to send a portion of the money from their checking account to a third party.

The FBI included several examples of the email instructions from scammers in its public service announcement.

  • "You will need some materials/software and also a time tracker to commence your training and orientation and also you need the software to get started with work. The funds for the software will be provided for you by the company via check. Make sure you use them as instructed for the software and I will refer you to the vendor you are to purchase them from, okay."
  • "I have forwarded your start-up progress report to the HR Dept. and they will be facilitating your start-up funds with which you will be getting your working equipment from vendors and getting started with training."
  • "Enclosed is your first check. Please cash the check, take $300 out as your pay, and send the rest to the vendor for supplies."

After a student completes all of these steps, the results can be damaging -- they would need to reimburse the bank for the amount of the counterfeit checks, their bank account could be closed, their credit score could drop and they could be vulnerable to identity theft after divulging personal information to the scammers.

The FBI is encouraging students to report suspicious emails to their institution’s IT department and the FBI. The bureau also advises students never to accept a job that asks them to deposit or wire money.

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