techfaculty

Udacity to Stop Issuing Free Certificates of Completion

Beginning next month, the massive open online course provider Udacity will cut the first O from the acronym and only offer MOCs. Founder Sebastian Thrun, whose "pivot" last year shifted the company's focus to corporate training, in a blog post announced Udacity will stop issuing free course completion certificates on May 16. The course materials will still be available on the website for independent study, but in order to earn a certificate, students need to verify their identity. That track is currently available for about $150 a month.

"Discontinuing the 'free' certificates has been one of the most difficult decisions we've made," Thrun wrote. "We know that many of our hardworking students can’t afford to pay for classes. At the same time, we cannot hope that our certificates will ever carry great value, if we don’t make this change."

The Pulse podcast features interview with Charley Miller of TouchCast

Smart Title: 

This month's edition of The Pulse podcast features an interview with Charley Miller, head of product at TouchCast, a new video production software.

Miller talks with Rodney B. Murray, host of The Pulse. They discuss how TouchCast differs from other video editors and its possible uses in the classroom.

Cengage Learning emerges from bankruptcy with focus on digital growth

Section: 
Smart Title: 

After nine months, Cengage Learning emerges from bankruptcy -- and gets right back to addressing familiar challenges.

Liberal arts college library directors ask publishers to ease ebook licensing restrictions

Smart Title: 

Library directors at 66 liberal arts colleges call on publishers to ease ebook licensing restrictions.

Much change, some progress dominate second annual Online Learning Summit

Smart Title: 

At the second Online Learning Summit, educators survey a landscape vastly different from a year ago.

Few freshmen expect to take fully online classes, study finds

Smart Title: 

A survey of freshmen finds that while most high school students use online education websites on their own time, very few see fully online courses in their higher education future.

CourseSmart, the publishing industry's e-textbook provider, acquired by Vital Source

Smart Title: 

CourseSmart, the e-textbook provider backed by the academic publishing industry, is acquired by the platform Vital Source.

At Bowdoin and other colleges, online course credit gets a second look

Smart Title: 

Despite the growth of online education, some colleges -- especially small liberal arts institutions -- have absolute bans on credit for such work. Some are starting to consider a shift.

Former nursing students sue Excelsior College over 'deceptive or misleading practices'

Smart Title: 

Excelsior College, the world's largest distance educator of nurses, is sued by former students alleging the institution deceived them.

Harvard, MIT Launch MOOC Student Visualization Tools

Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the two institutions behind the massive open online course provider edX, on Thursday released a set of tools that visualize the age, gender, location and level of education of their almost 2 million MOOC users.

Called Insights, the tools were developed by Sergiy Nesterko and Daniel Seaton, research fellows at HarvardX and MIT, respectively. In a news release, Nesterko said Insights “can help to guide instruction while courses are running and deepen our understanding of the impact of courses after they are complete.”

A side-by-side comparison of HarvardX and MITx’s enrollment numbers shows Harvard’s MOOCs have attracted more than 1 million users to MIT’s roughly 820,000. More than one-third of Harvard’s MOOC students are in the U.S., compared to about one-quarter of MIT’s. The only other country to register in the double digits among either institution is India, whose students account for 15.5 percent of HarvardX’s total enrollment.

Similar to the student bodies at the physical campuses, MITx students are more likely to be male -- 66.2 percent to HarvardX’s 59.5 percent. They are also younger -- MITx’s median age is 27; HarvardX’s, 28 -- and, by a few percentage points, less likely to hold a postsecondary degree. MOOCs are still dominated by students who hold such a degree, however. Among MITx students, 64.6 percent hold at least a bachelor’s degree, and for HarvardX, those students make up more than two-thirds, or 67.8 percent, of the total enrollment.

Insights will be made available to the member institutions in the edX consortium.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - techfaculty
Back to Top