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February 12, 2016
Indigenous people in Costa Rica are looking to have their history preserved. In today's Academic Minute, American Public University's Michelle Watts explores the uncertain future of many of these groups and their sacred sites in their Central American homeland.

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Archive

October 1, 2012
In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Cincinnati's Vernon Scarborough examines the complex infrastructure that supplied the largest Mayan city with water.
September 28, 2012
In today’s Academic Minute, Florida State University's Elaine Treharne explores the discovery of an inscription that provides rare insight into the nature of romantic relationships at the Tudor court.
September 27, 2012
Inside Higher Ed presents a webinar featuring Andrew Koch, executive vice president of the John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education, and Matt Pistilli, a research scientist in information technology at Purdue University, exploring the combination of two important strategies in college completion: how to use analytics to improve student completion and student learning in gateway courses.
September 27, 2012
In today’s Academic Minute, DePaul University's Sean Horan describes how those in stressful occupations often use humor as a coping mechanism in their relationships.
September 26, 2012
In today’s Academic Minute, Syracuse University's Jason Fridley explores how and when many invasive plants outcompete indigenous species.

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