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October 25, 2016
How did the Electoral College come to be? In today's Academic Minute, Stanford University's Jack Rakove explores the origin of this sometimes maligned style of election.

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October 31, 2014
Our new program took a deep dive into the Obama administration's newly released gainful employment regulations and the rules' implications for the for-profit sector of higher education. Joining Inside Higher Ed's Doug Lederman and the moderator Casey Green for the conversation were Ben Miller of the New America Foundation and Vickie Schray of Bridgepoint Education.
October 31, 2014
Graveyards are spooky. As such, they often serve as the backdrop for scary scenes in literature and film. In today's Academic Minute, Monmouth University's Richard Veit explains that they're more than that -- graveyards embody a rich cultural, historical and artistic presence.
October 30, 2014
The presence of bats is a common theme for films, literature and anything angling to emit a creepy vibe. In today's Academic Minute, the University of Scranton's Gary Kwiecinski describes his work to save them.
October 29, 2014
In today's Academic Minute, the University of Missouri's Heidi Appel and Rex Cocroft demonstrate how plants can hear predators.
October 28, 2014
We’re not exactly sure what yawns are or why we yawn. We know they’re contagious, but we’re still working out all the other details. In today's Academic Minute, the State University of New York at Oneonta's Andrew Gallup posits that yawns are a mechanism designed to cool the brain.


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