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November 21, 2010 - 8:30pm
Two surveys released earlier this month add detail to the map of online education in the United States. The 2010 Sloan Consortium Report documents the continuing growth of online education and the impact of the current economic downturn on rising online enrollments.
November 21, 2010 - 8:26pm
The phrase was new to me but the concept and the consequences are very familiar. William G. Bowen, in giving the keynote address at the recent TIAA-CREF Higher Education Leadership Conference, talked about students and their families underinvesting in higher education. Given the important economic and social benefits of higher education, why would there be underinvestment and how does this work? The reason for the underinvestment is simple — many families are looking for a bargain. They are looking to get the degree at a lower cost or possibly at the lowest cost possible.
November 21, 2010 - 6:54pm
This weekend The Girl got hit by a nasty stomach bug, so nobody got much sleep and our Sunday plans were discombobulated. It brought back memories of those times when TW still worked outside the house, and we had to do the Sick Kid Shuffle.When your kid normally goes to daycare, a sick kid is a major crisis. Suddenly your first line of defense is down, since you can’t take a sick kid to daycare. (I’ve seen parents try it, though.) Most days, we had to choose among several imperfect options:
November 21, 2010 - 4:20pm
Earlier this week, a friend and I visited the Lower East Side Tenement Museum to take the “Moore Family Tour,” a guided tour of a tenement apartment that has been restored to reflect the tenancy of William and Bridget Moore and their three daughters, who lived there in 1869. The Moores had emigrated in the aftermath of the Irish Potato Famine, and arrived to encounter virulent anti-Irish sentiment, garbage-strewn streets, and loud and unsanitary living conditions.
November 20, 2010 - 2:00pm
The university held a Town Hall Meeting on Campus Safety here last weekend, which, for better or worse, coincided with Dads Weekend. Parents with distinguished-looking silver hair, wearing New Balance running shoes and the most expensive versions of school-pride parkas, lined up before the meeting to buy pumpkin spice lattes, hot chocolate, and cranberry scones from the coffee shop in the union.
November 18, 2010 - 11:15pm
 A few of the world’s research universities have established Institutes of Advanced Study—small, usually interdisciplinary, centers that bring together scholars and researchers from different fields, sponsor fellowships, invite top academics from other universities to campus, and in general provide intellectual ferment to the sponsoring university.
November 18, 2010 - 9:45pm
When I was in college in North Carolina, no one really thought much about "abroad" experiences. If you did go abroad, you went to Europe to study French or, as in my case, to learn Spanish in Madrid. The norm was to think of your career aspirations as a domestic endeavor. At the time, the Peace Corps seemed only to want engineering and nursing students, so it wasn't a viable option for an arts-n-science student.
November 18, 2010 - 9:30pm
I like writing about ed tech companies, particularly startup companies and the products/services that emerge from innovation centers within established industries. Writing and teaching are the best ways to learn. A large chunk of the innovation in teaching, learning and educational productivity will come from companies. I've worked in a publishing / ed tech semi-startup (Britannica.com Education), and learned that companies are filled with educators who see market mechanisms at the fastest and most efficient manner to disrupt the higher ed status quo.
November 18, 2010 - 9:20pm
One of the reasons I fell in love with the field of economics was its logical progression, the linear way it tends to build upon previous concepts to uncover a consistent way of looking at the world. In many ways, all of knowledge does the same thing, building upon previous skills as one learns first how to read and add, and finally, to put it all together in discovering things about the world that require the synthesis of some very different fields of study. I thought of this recently as I enjoyed a musical production at my daughter’s school.

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