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December 7, 2011
Carol Twigg raises doubts about the ultimate viability of the Khan Academy.  Khan raises the question of completion rates verses quality of education.  These questions are red herrings. The Khan Academy is trying something in an era when education is challenged by stagnation, technology, global competition and gross domestic inequalities. I thought of two people when I read the article in IHE about it today.  The first is Franklin Delano Roosevelt.  The second is my Aunt Toni.
December 7, 2011
Last week, I found myself fascinated by Tim Sherrat’s observation that interfaces are sites of power. Similarly, the architecture of a library says a lot to its users about the position they hold in the realm of knowledge, as visitors, consumers, or as members of a discipline or a tradition.
December 7, 2011
Reading the academic blogosphere, you’d think there were only two kinds of faculty: tenure-track (or tenured)  and adjunct. But that’s not true.
December 6, 2011
Why the decline of tenure and tenure-track faculty has lead to other problems and conflicts in higher education.
December 6, 2011
This past weekend I went bowling, and I lost.  3 games to nil.  My opponent - a 13 year old middle-schooler. 
December 6, 2011
Grad school is a unique experience, especially in an increasingly digital world. Often the study skills that helped us excel in undergrad no longer suffice at this higher level. The relationships with professors also changes drastically as we find ourselves in limbo between student and colleague. Grad school is an extended period of transition moving from student to teacher, from taking classes to doing independent research, and from being the novice to the expert. Given how unique this experience is, and the fact that the majority of people don’t go to grad school, making the transition can be difficult.
December 6, 2011
Data from Google show what types of degrees and programs people are searching for.
December 6, 2011
In response to yesterday’s piece about the lack of generational turnover in college leadership, a particularly thoughtful comment deserved a post in itself. "Shannon" wrote:
December 5, 2011
I have this hypothesis that edtech companies are overly worried about sharing their future product roadmaps, and that they would in fact benefit from being more transparent and inclusive in the development and sharing of future plans.
December 5, 2011
When I first started working in academia as full-time staff, I was 24 years old, and had graduated only 18 months earlier. I envisioned myself still a student, and technically, since I was enrolled in a part-time graduate program, I was. My friends were still students, some undergraduate, some had moved on to graduate programs. I thought I was able to offer the “older” staff relevant opinions on what students would or would not like, which I hope was partly true.

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