Higher Education Webinars

Confessions of a Community College Dean

In which a veteran of cultural studies seminars in the 1990s moves into academic administration and finds himself a married suburban father of two. Foucault, plus lawn care.

May 5, 2010 - 4:41am
Last night "Frontline" did a show on for-profit higher education. It was a disappointing episode in many ways.
May 3, 2010 - 10:45pm
A cagey correspondent writes: A former colleague of my husband (at another college) tells my husband that she was just offered a tenure track position in the new department at a small public college. She tells my husband that the spouse of a colleague of her husband got her the opportunity to apply. Let's give them fake names: Yuppy: the small local public college expanding with a new department BigMed: public grad school with tons of money where my husband used to be research track
May 2, 2010 - 9:16pm
This Saturday The Girl had her first t-ball game. T-ball, for the uninitiated, is a version of baseball in which the batter hits the ball off a stationary tee, rather than trying to hit a moving (pitched) ball. It's a chance for little kids to get some exposure to baseball before developing the eye-hand coordination to hit pitches. If you haven't seen five-year-olds play t-ball, add it to your bucket list.
April 29, 2010 - 9:53pm
A new correspondent writes: I work in an English Department at a mid-sized community college and currently chair a search committee for my department. Our department would like to change the way we recruit and hire folks in English for full-time positions.
April 28, 2010 - 9:39pm
A few weeks ago, I aired out some thoughts on webinars and their seemingly endemic suckitude. This week, several alert readers directed me to this story in the New York Times about how PowerPoint is directly responsible for the failure to catch Bin Laden.
April 27, 2010 - 10:06pm
Mid-April to Mid-May is always the hardest time of year. All of the end-of-year stuff comes to a head at this point. The students are stressed about papers/projects/finals, and the faculty are in grading jail. This is when my evenings fill at an alarming rate, with various 'culmination' events and ceremonies. With the clock ticking on the semester, anything that requires faculty involvement (i.e. program reviews, faculty hires) has to happen now. Which is to say, I'm wiped. That's normal for this time of year.
April 26, 2010 - 9:08pm
This piece in the Chronicle got me thinking about Presidents and Vice Presidents I've worked under who had stayed on too long. It has happened more than once. In every case, the hangers-on had tremendous reputations built on past achievements. In each case, I'm told, the achievements that made their names were genuinely impressive, and people on the outside still held them in high regard. But on the inside, you could see the decay.
April 25, 2010 - 9:22pm
I had a good discussion last week with a well-meaning professor who wanted to know why the minimum enrollment to run a section is higher than the break-even cost of paying an adjunct. Her position was that another section doesn't add much marginal cost, and as long as you've paid the adjunct, what's the problem? It was one of those "where you stand depends on where you sit" moments. I'll make it a multiple choice. If another section doesn't add much marginal cost, and it generates enough tuition/fee revenue to pay the adjunct, what's the problem?
April 22, 2010 - 10:25pm
I suspect that variations on this will become more common in the next several years. A new correspondent writes:
April 21, 2010 - 11:18pm
From much of the discussion of 'data-driven' reforms that take place at the national level, you'd think that all that we'd need to do is educate some administrators on the use and interpretation of data, tell them to use what they've learned, and that would be that. If only it were that easy...

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