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October 23, 2011
Every year or two, I need to restore what passes for my sanity. When that need arises, I read. More specifically, I re-read. And one of the writers it does me the most good to re-read is Wendell Berry.
October 23, 2011
Michael Feldstein has a terrific post over on his e-Literate blog: "Why Pearson’s OpenClass Is a Big Deal." Michael's post triggered thoughts on 4 areas in which I'd like to see Pearson demonstrate transparency around OpenClass:
October 23, 2011
My kids and I decided that yesterday should be a day we spend in Manhattan.  We were already set to meet a terrific former student of mine/good friend and her daughter to go shopping on the lower east side (Canal Street) but we decided to go for the entire day. We started at the Museum of Natural History where the regular exhibits as well as the special exhibits always fascinate. 
October 23, 2011
My friend Beth Adubato was raped in 1981 in her dorm room at the College of William and Mary after leaving a fraternity party. Her attacker, a popular athlete, insisted that the event was consensual and was believed by the administration and many students. He went unpunished, while she suffered a severe stress reaction and had to drop out of school.
October 23, 2011
In the New York Times article, "Why Does Facebook Want Our Kids," the on-going micro debate about the Child Online Privacy Protect Act illuminates the macro market influence that Facebook has on social norms of youth culture. May the law always be such a guide!
October 21, 2011
Women in the media. The latest news for the academic audience
October 21, 2011
One of the things I like most about math and teaching math is that there are often several different ways to get to an answer. For example, if one wanted to differentiate the square of a binomial function, one could multiply (FOIL) it out and then take the derivative, or one could use the product rule or even the chain rule. I often show students how the same answer can be arrived at in multiple ways, filling the board with several different calculations that miraculously all give the same value in the end. It is then that I am tempted to write the letters “Q.E.D.” on the board, which, as we used to joke in graduate school, is Latin for “ta da!”  
October 20, 2011
EDUCAUSE manages to cram in many different meeting experiences during a single conference. We go to EDUCAUSE to learn best practices from our peers, get inspired by thought leaders, discuss the latest trends in technology and learning - and oh yes - absorb the new products and roadmaps of our existing and potential ed tech vendor partners.
October 20, 2011
A new correspondent writes: I'm a new hire in my second year at a large community college in the Mid-Atlantic region. During my first year I largely kept my eyes and ears open and my mouth shut as I adjusted to a new workplace with its own culture, policies, and personnel. Tenure reviews from my committee and student evaluations were glowing, and overall, everyone seems pretty glad they hired me. During that first year and more recently I've seen a few things going on that I don't agree with or have strong opinions about. Some are issues at the district level, some at the college level, and some are within my own division. This year I've started speaking up in division meetings and in conferences, trying to offer solutions and different points of view rather than point fingers. The feedback from fellow faculty has been positive - they like that I'm speaking up, even if they don't necessarily agree with me all the time. Various members of the administration, however, have taken notice as well and the feedback from them hasn't been as positive. I suspect they prefer the 'company guy' they saw in my first year rather than this new guy with his opinions (which on occasion are diametrically opposed to those of administration). Do you have any tips on how to navigate tenure while still maintaining my self respect? I can't abide muzzling myself for another two years, but I don't want to get pegged as a troublesome faculty member by administration and risk not getting tenure either.

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