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May 23, 2010 - 7:50pm
A few weeks ago I met with my son’s advisor to discuss his academic progress as he nears the end of the tenth grade. She was generally positive about his college prospects: “His grades aren’t perfect, but his standardized tests are stellar, and he’ll get great recommendations,” she said. “Besides, he’s a boy.”I knew what that meant, thanks to discussions on this blog. “I have mixed feelings about that,” I told her. “I’m happy for anything that will help Ben, but…”“I know. I have a daughter.”
May 23, 2010 - 6:33pm
If you want to make God laugh, tell Him your plans.All gods were originally weather gods, and the weather gods are laughing at us. - Margaret Atwood
May 21, 2010 - 6:44am
I recently had the privilege of my work as a learning technologist being profiled in the Upper Valley at Work series. The goal of of profile series is:"..intended to give young people a sense of the options they may have to find meaningful employment in this region. The profile series will communicate that there are a variety of paths to follow towards success, and that there is great value in starting the journey by taking time to identify and utilize one's unique combination of strengths and interests."
May 21, 2010 - 4:48am
This past weekend, TW and I left the kids with her parents, got on a plane, and went out of town for a couple of days. I hadn't realized how much we needed to do that until we did it.We love our kids dearly, but sometimes it's healthy to slip out of 'parent' mode. And with the end-of-semester insanity on campus in full swing, the change of scene did some good. We even managed to keep the calls home to a reasonable minimum.Benefits of leaving the kids at home:--We went to restaurants that don't even serve chicken tenders.
May 20, 2010 - 8:45pm
Once, years ago, I found myself at a party talking about what it would mean to divide by zero. (No wonder I was terminally single at the time!) I explained that, while we can’t divide by zero, we can think of approaching a divisor of zero, and see what happens. Think first of dividing 1 by 1, to get 1/1, or 1. Now divide 1 by 0.1, to get 10. Continue on to divide 1 by 0.01 to get 100, and 1 by 0.001 to get 1000. You can see that if you continue on like this, the smaller the divisor gets, the larger the ratio gets.
May 20, 2010 - 8:08pm
As noted earlier, I confuse easily.The latest example comes from a Shared Responsibility Study put out by Cone, LLC (whose service mark is "Building Brand Trust"). A summary of the study is free upon registration at their website.
May 20, 2010 - 7:42am
I’ve been focused on the tragic, on-going oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico: first, because my current documentary is about the erosion of Louisiana’s coastline and the disappearance of bayou cultures. And second, the spill reminds me of my own dependence on oil for long distance commuting to see my kids in Florida.
May 19, 2010 - 9:32pm
A newish dean at a new institution writes:Adding to the coming in from the 'outside' pressure is the fact that the faculty have a union. When a colleague tried to begin an assessment program to meet the [agency] accrediting revisions, the faculty union point man and union pooh-poohed the measure. As of now, the assessment process consists of an open-ended "how do you assess student learning" question for each faculty member. It's my new job to get things where they need to be--identify, measure, report, use, repeat.
May 19, 2010 - 9:16pm
This week, faculty and staff at my institution will be getting together to discuss Louis Menand's The Marketplace of Ideas: Reform and Resistance in the American University.Thought I'd share with you some of the questions I came up with to help guide our discussion. Any suggestions that you have for discussion questions (or answers to the questions below) would be appreciated.The questions:
May 19, 2010 - 9:09pm
I confuse easily. I 'm aware of that fact and, being aware of it, take solace when I learn of someone else who confuses as easily as I do.


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