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June 22, 2011
I’m visiting my father right now, and was lucky to have enjoyed a wonderful Father’s day with him and my husband, and my brother (for a little while, at least, via Skype): my all-time personal favorite fathers.
June 21, 2011
Summer is here, and for many academics, this is not just the season for relaxation but also the time for conference presentations. I know many colleagues who tremble at the thought of standing in front of an unknown and critically-minded audience who would potentially tear apart one’s every argument. I do not fear the presentation moment, on the contrary I always look forward to it as the time when my ideas, concocted in the solitude of my academic life get to breathe fresh air and receive the feedback that will refine them.
June 21, 2011
While it is true that our friends, the economists, failed to predict some key events (…say a global economic crisis for one, but whose keeping score?), the dismal science does have a few things to teach us about decision making in campus technology.
June 21, 2011
"Doing more with less." It's a familiar saying for folks who work in higher education. One casualty of budget reductions has been funding lines for professional development. Some of my colleagues have been restricted from traveling out of state for conferences and the overall climate of professional development within student affairs isn't very positive.
June 21, 2011
The Union of Concerned Scientists today released their interactive global Climate Hot Map. Icons on the map correspond to locations where the effects of global warming are already evident -- the geographic distribution is pretty wide.
June 21, 2011
A hot new topic for gossip in British university common rooms emerged over the weekend of 4/5 June with news of the launch of the “New College of the Humanities” (www.nchum.org), to be located in Bloomsbury, the home of many of the institutions that comprise the University of London.
June 21, 2011
Viewing a fossilized mammoth skeleton at the Children’s Museum. The spread of the pelvis, wide as an elephant’s ears. The curved radius of ribs. Together, pelvis and ribs define what’s gone missing: The giant’s bag of viscera—all the fluid, dark, red, gurgling organs the first to go. What is most alive goes most noticeably absent. The embarrassment of bones.
June 20, 2011
This piece in Salon has drawn some attention lately. It's a recounting of an academic advisor's usual responses to parents who ask, regarding their children who have chosen liberal arts majors, what they're going to do with that. The piece basically sides with the parents, noting that the combination of a backbreaking recession, what Richard Florida calls a “reset,” and record-high student loan burdens makes the usual question much more relevant than it once was.

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