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August 18, 2009 - 9:08pm
I write, not from the dead, but from the depths, that murky blob marked library on your campus map, that innocent but somehow chilling link on your institution’s home page, that awkward corner of uncertainty in your otherwise confident professional psyche. Nothing else inside higher ed both unites and repels in quite the same way: everyone seeks information — which is simply the recorded experience and advice of our forebears — yet everyone trembles when they venture beyond the few narrow paths they already know. The campus library is the Great Grimpen Mire of academe.
August 18, 2009 - 8:57pm
I &*%#(%*& hate parking. There is no obvious, elegant way to handle a sudden influx of students when parking is already tight.The two iron laws of parking:1. There is never enough.2. Thou shalt not add parking, anywhere, ever.Corrolary: Calling attention to the contradiction between 1 and 2 is bad form.
August 17, 2009 - 9:08pm
Commiserating with an administrative colleague at another college, I discovered that we're both dealing with the same issue. I call it input without content. With budgetary issues looking like they'll get worse before they get better -- public higher ed usually lags economic recoveries -- the campus is abuzz with concerns about possible cuts and budget-driven decisions. The laws of economic gravity being what they are, there's simply no way to take the kinds of cuts to appropriations we're taking and not feel them. So we have to make some decisions about how to handle them.
August 17, 2009 - 8:34pm
Sometimes, the world is just trying to tell me something. Occasionally, I get the message.First, I read yesterday's excellent "Momma PhD" post by Susan O'Doherty, which spoke to her own realization of her earlier presumption of privilege.
August 16, 2009 - 8:32pm
One of the people on campus I talk to fairly regularly works at Greenback's main library. I'm not sure whether there's a specific reason for it or not, but the library staff seems to be more enthusiastic about sustainability than are the employees of just about any other department.
August 16, 2009 - 8:00pm
No Woman Is an Island, Part 3 (The last one, I promise): The Privilege of Not Recognizing PrivilegeA friend responded to my post of last week in a way that took me aback: “You said you were trying to educate yourself about the issues faced by non-academic university employees — but that is what you were!”
August 16, 2009 - 7:54pm
The four of us made a trek to the Middle of Nowhere, to a cabin with my Mom, my brother, his wife, and The Niece. The Niece is two-and-a-half now, and she and The Girl immediately bonded. For those who haven't spent time recently in the company of preschool-aged girls, 'bonding' sounds like this:SQUEAL hee hee hee hee SCREECH hee hee hee SCREECH hee hee hee
August 13, 2009 - 9:51pm
In economics, we draw a graph matching the various prices that a good could be sold at with the quantity of that good that people would be willing to buy at each price and call it a “demand curve.” Sloping down, this demand curve can shift for many different reasons. Some of these reasons include changes in the income of the consumers involved, changes in the prices of substitutes or complementary goods, or changes in popularity of the goods themselves. For example, I suspect that the demand curve for horse-drawn carriages has shifted greatly since the advent of the automobile.
August 13, 2009 - 9:46pm
A midwestern correspondent writes: I'm starting a new full-time job next month, and I'm really excited about it. But my new college has a 60 day waiting period between my start date and when I actually receive health insurance. I'm grateful for the job, of course, but I don't understand the 60 days. Do you know why I have to pay for COBRA for two months into a new job?First, congratulations on the job! In this year's market, that's particularly great news!
August 13, 2009 - 8:07pm
As I mentioned in an earlier post, one of the things I noticed on the way to vacation was an increased incidence of wind turbines. I had presumed that it related to the relatively constant breezes typical of many coastal environments. But maybe not.


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