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November 11, 2010 - 10:15pm
I want a Kindle option for my digital coursepack. Almost everyone I'm working with insists that this is a bad idea. iPad, yes. Browser, yes. LMS integration, yes. Print-on-demand, yes. But Kindle, no.
November 11, 2010 - 10:00pm
What's new [with technology]? How do you do it? You must be online all the time? I get asked these questions all of the time. Sometimes it happens when I'm speaking in front of a group of student affairs professionals. People often assume that I am online all of the time. That I am constantly connected to the web. I always tell people that my method of receiving and digesting technology news and information is really not that complicated. It's a combination of experience (time does matter) and a well-connected / well-placed network of sites and tools.
November 11, 2010 - 9:56pm
Actual dinner conversation:TW: So-and-so is dumb as a rock.TG: Rocks aren’t dumb!
November 11, 2010 - 9:45pm
The buzz at the recent Charleston Conference (and practically every other recent conference at which academic librarians have gathered) is a combination of new formats and a new collection development philosophy, shifting from print collections with titles chosen by librarians and faculty to making thousands of e-books available and letting the purchasing choices be made by "patrons"--an old-fashioned term for library users of all stripes, a large contingent of which are undergraduates writing "research papers" that
November 11, 2010 - 9:30pm
I like conferences, I confess. There are so many types of conferences these days that it is hard to choose one’s favorites: there are “regular” conferences, a slowly vanishing category. Then we have virtual conferences, which may be poised to become the new regular kind, with many billions in value.
November 11, 2010 - 7:53pm
One way that economists commonly use statistics is to do “forecasting”, to take what is known about today and to use it to predict what will happen tomorrow. I usually use statistics in ways that don’t involve forecasting in the future, but instead to test for relationships in data from the present. Still, there are times I wish I could forecast the future and know how things will look years from now. For example, I wished I could have such a “crystal ball” the other day.
November 11, 2010 - 6:04am
It's time to order the books for my spring courses. Because I teach Victorian novels, I'm continually trying to negotiate length; how many pages can I coax my students to read a week (or rather from Thursday to Tuesday, and then from Tuesday to Thursday). This causes me to engage in one of my disingenuous teaching practices: searching for the shortest edition of David Copperfield, or Middlemarch. Yes, I realize that all unabridged versions are really the same number of total words. But tell that to students asked to read 250 pages instead of 150.
November 10, 2010 - 10:00pm
“But I have to tell you, the biggest objection to [regulation] has come from the fact that The Washington Post would go out of business if Kaplan went out of business.....,” Roberts said with a chuckle. “Because The Washington Post money all comes from Kaplan.....” --'Learning From For-Profits' IHE, 11/8/10 Jack Stripling
November 10, 2010 - 2:45pm
I had the pleasure of attending the NACAS Annual Conference in Colorado Springs this week. Campus auxiliary services professionals from a variety of higher education institutions came together to attend/present education sessions, network, and expand their knowledge as practitioners.

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