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December 17, 2009 - 9:51pm
1. Learning technology coheres into an academic discipline: offers courses, has a theoretical foundation, conducts research, peer review, and a shared identity. 2. Innovation in teaching methods becomes a major factor in tenure and promotion.3. Increased movement of campus resources toward learning technology.4. Normative that learning technology professionals design and teach or co-teach courses (as part of regular compensation).5. Erosion of distinction between on-ground, hybrid and online learning (best method for each purpose).
December 17, 2009 - 9:47pm
Our jobs as professors are built around truth and integrity. We spend our research time searching for the truth, and, once we find a piece of it, we teach and profess that truth in journals and classrooms, hence earning us the name of "professor." Indeed, if someone was to claim our idea as their own, we would be outraged, as we rightly are if our students claim work to be their own when it is not.
December 17, 2009 - 3:10pm
“The ancient Romans had a tradition: whenever one of their engineers constructed an arch, as the capstone was hoisted into place, the engineer assumed accountability for his work in the most profound way possible: he stood under the arch.” - Michael Armstrong (former Chairman of AT&T)I don't know whether Armstrong's literally correct on that one or not. In fact, I don't really care. It's one of those stories that, if it's not true, it should be. And it's not like some ancient Roman is going to rise up and tell Armstrong he's wrong.
December 17, 2009 - 1:26pm
"You're excited," said my husband to me as I entered the car last night after my second Messiah rehearsal at the Landon School here in Bethesda. I'd only said a sentence or two, nothing special. He was responding to my tone of voice, my body language.
December 17, 2009 - 4:11am
TW has commented, correctly, that part of the reason I'm suited to academic administration is that I'm prone to repressing emotions. Although that can be frustrating in private life, it can work well in difficult meetings. But some occasions manage to break through the repression, even when I know what's coming.Although the main campus graduation ceremony occurs in late May, some of the specialized programs have December ceremonies. And since they're small, some of them allow the students to give little statements thanking people.
December 16, 2009 - 9:21pm
What does ‘home for the holidays’ mean when you aren’t really sure where your home is located?Marc Auge’s book, Non-Places: Introduction to an Anthropology of Supermodernity, begins with a description of a man driving to an airport, parking in “row J of underground level 2,” getting his boarding pass, leafing through magazines, and pleasantly boarding his flight. On the plane he leafs through more magazines, puts on earphones and enjoys the fact that he is “alone at last.”
December 16, 2009 - 8:30pm
Warning: This blog post is entirely speculative and quite likely wrong in many (if not all) areas. Unfortunately, I know little about Desire2Learn - having never utilized their LMS. The Desire2Learn people I heard speak at the EDUCAUSE conference were quite smart, and I heard positive things about the platform from some attendees. Pearson's LearningStudio is a new platform created out of the acquisition of eCollege and Fronter.
December 16, 2009 - 9:43am
Two weeks ago I reported on a proposal about to come up for vote in the University of Maryland senate to relax family leave policy. So here’s the update: it passed in the senate. Before it becomes university policy it will need to be approved by President Dan Mote, which looks promising; he has been cited as supportive of this measure. This proposal will allow faculty to reduce their loads (and the salary, commensurately) down to 50% while they are raising children under five.
December 15, 2009 - 9:24pm
You know you're grading on a curve when settling to pay out only $78 million causes your stock to go up. The University of Phoenix has reached a settlement in a False Claims Act lawsuit, in which it was charged with violating Federal law by paying admissions recruiters based on how many students they recruited. It had set aside slightly over $80 million for a settlement, and came in slightly below that. In the Chronicle piece about it, DeVry and Grand Canyon Education are alleged to have set aside about $5 million each to settle similar suits.
December 15, 2009 - 8:57pm
Thanks to Terry Calhoun for stating briefly what I will now attempt to say with excruciating verbosity. I've been thinking about this since my last post -- it just took a while to meld.


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