Higher Education Webinars

Getting to Green

An administrator pushes, on a shoestring budget, to move his university and the world toward a more sustainable equilibrium.

December 10, 2008 - 5:49pm
The sustainability crisis, the economic crisis, the fact that the US Chamber of Commerce (among other bad actors) is trying to sell the only political leadership we've got on the idea that the economic crisis means that we shouldn't have to deal with the sustainabilty crisis (when just the opposite is more like the truth) ... all of these are indicators of just how deeply systemic our real problems are, and how much we need to reinvent our systems and our paradigms to get out of the mess we're in.
December 9, 2008 - 9:30am
As the title implies, this is reading for everybody. I don't care whether you're concerned about issues of sustainability, national security, economic prosperity or the fiasco which is the Bowl Championship Series. You need to read this. Everybody you know needs to read this. Everybody they know needs to read this.
December 5, 2008 - 5:54pm
So, I'm reading Daphne Wysham's pretty good article on Foreign Policy in Focus, about the costs ... errr ... investment opportunities inherent in global society's need to mitigate greenhouse gasses. And I'm saying to myself, how can we frame this as a growth industry? If what the world needs now is better climate, why can't providing that be the kind of economic engine that addressing the world's other needs (transportation, communication, nutrition, destruction) has always been?
December 2, 2008 - 9:07pm
No, I'm not thinking about backing up to parallel park (do drivers know how to do that any more?), although my topic is auto-related.I was reading an article in New Scientist magazine (available online, but by subscription only I'm afraid). It spoke about the hydrogen economy -- or the lack of the one which had been predicted -- and mentioned Arnold Swarzenegger's seemingly futile aspiration for a "hydrogen highway" with 200 hydrogen refueling stations. (To date, California has 5.)
December 1, 2008 - 7:27am
One of the most frequent topics when sustainability wonks get together, in person or online, is "greenwashing". Greenwashing -- the design and production of products which can be marketed as contributing to sustainability, but which in practice change little or nothing for the better -- is a frequent practice and an even more frequent accusation. Would switching to product X, or service Y, or process Z really reduce greenhouse gas emissions? Are the benefits real? Is the approach well-intentioned but fundamentally flawed?
November 26, 2008 - 2:29pm
Last summer, executives at three of Japan's largest banks decreed that all their offices would be cooled only to 82 degrees Fahrenheit. It's part of a nationwide initiative called "Cool Biz", whereby businesses compete for customer loyalty by demonstrating leadership in greenhouse gas reduction. Salarymen have reportedly made a significant sacrifice of social status by going to work tie-less as a result.
November 25, 2008 - 5:37pm
First, the hi-tech -- a tremendous opportunity for innovative engineering and business schools.
November 21, 2008 - 3:27pm
As a campus sustainability wonk, much of my work has to do with carbon dioxide equivalent. How much did Greenback emit last year? What can we do to reduce emissions from heating our buildings? From driving on (or to) campus? How much did we save with this innovation, that initiative, or the latest competition? How long will it take us to get down to (supply your own target level here)?
November 18, 2008 - 1:31pm
There's been a thread recently on the Green Schools List about the impacts experienced by colleges and universities which have removed the traditional cafeteria trays from their dining facilities. Results range widely.
November 17, 2008 - 12:48pm
OK, just one more post emanating from AASHE 2008, and then I won't mention it again. I promise. Unless I'm provoked.


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